Discovery

Heavy Snow Boosts Flooding Risk for...

Heavy Snow Boosts Flooding Risk for New York State

Record-breaking snowfall that buried towns near Buffalo, New York, and killed at least 14 people posed a major flooding threat Saturday with temperatures forecast to rise.
What Warming Means for Lake Effect ...

What Warming Means for Lake Effect Snow

Global warming could fuel more lake effect snows like the one that buried Buffalo, at least for awhile. Continue reading â??
Chemical Change Causing Lakes to Ge...

Chemical Change Causing Lakes to Get Gooey

Acid rain and deforestation runoff are causing a drop in the calcium content of some lakes in North America and western Europe, with ominous potential effects. Continue reading â??
Poo Power Fuels New UK Bus

Poo Power Fuels New UK Bus

The U.K.'s new 'Bio-Bus' carries 40 people and is powered by biomethane, produced by human and food waste.
It's Chilly, But Record Cold Years ...

It's Chilly, But Record Cold Years Are Gone

2014 is even more likely to become the warmest year on record, with record cold years a thing of the past.
Satellite Shows Frigid Arctic Air O...

Satellite Shows Frigid Arctic Air Over Eastern US

A new satellite photo shows the eastern United States locked in a cold front's icy grip.

Yahoo Science

Deregulation at heart of Japan's ne...

Deregulation at heart of Japan's new robotics revolution

Japan's robot venture company Cyberdyne's Lower Limb Model HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) for welfare use is seen next to a laptop showing HAL monitor, which indicates signals of users including the center point of the balance, shift of the center point of thBy Sophie Knight and Kaori Kaneko TOKYO (Reuters) - Neurosurgeon Tetsuya Goto had just begun testing a robot to perform brain surgery when he discovered Japan was moving to tighten regulations that would shut down his seven-year project.     Over the next dozen years he watched in frustration as the da Vinci, a rival endoscopic robot that U.S. regulators had already approved, became a commercial success while his and other Japanese prototypes languished in laboratories. ...

'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in ...

'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in South Africa

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - A tiny shrimp equipped with large, candy-striped eyes to ward off predators has been discovered in South African waters, the University of Cape Town said on Friday. The 10-15 mm-long crustacean has been christened the "star-gazer mysid" as its eyes seem to gaze permanently upwards. Similar to insects' eyes, they each look in a different direction. "The vivid ringed patterns are thought to be there to make the eyes appear to belong to a much bigger creature, and hence to scare off predators," the university said. ...
Banking culture breeds dishonesty, ...

Banking culture breeds dishonesty, scientific study finds

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - - A banking culture that implicitly puts financial gain above all else fuels greed and dishonesty and makes bankers more likely to cheat, according to the findings of a scientific study. Researchers in Switzerland studied bank workers and other professionals in experiments in which they won more money if they cheated, and found that bankers were more dishonest when they were made particularly aware of their professional role. ...
Want to live on the 'roof of the wo...

Want to live on the 'roof of the world'? Grow barley

Handout photo of a modern-day barley harvest in QinghaiBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Tibetan Plateau, the harsh Asian domain known as the 'roof of the world,' would not seem an ideal place for people to call home thanks to its extreme altitude, frigid temperatures, relentless winds and low-oxygen conditions. When people did succeed in colonizing this remote land, it was only after they discovered how to feed themselves year-round with cold-hardy crops like barley brought to the region from far away, scientists said on Thursday. ...

HIV drugs show promise in treating ...

HIV drugs show promise in treating common eye disease

Handout picture shows Retinal pigment epithelium treated with an HIV/AIDS drugBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A class of drugs used for three decades by people infected with the virus that causes AIDS may be effective in treating a leading cause of blindness among the elderly. HIV drugs called nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), including AZT and three others, blocked age-related macular degeneration in mice and worked well in experiments involving human retinal cells in the laboratory, researchers said on Thursday. In HIV-infected people, NRTIs block an enzyme the virus uses to create more copies of itself. ...

Ancient Egyptian Handbook of Spells...

Ancient Egyptian Handbook of Spells Deciphered

Researchers have deciphered an ancient Egyptian handbook, revealing a series of invocations and spells. "It is a complete 20-page parchment codex, containing the handbook of a ritual practitioner," write Malcolm Choat and Iain Gardner, who are professors in Australia at Macquarie University and the University of Sydney, respectively, in their book, "A Coptic Handbook of Ritual Power" (Brepols, 2014).

Physorg.com

Scientists seek more tombs at ancie...

Scientists seek more tombs at ancient Greek site

Officials say the vast ancient burial mound at Amphipolis in Greece could contain more than one dead.
Form Devices team designs Point as ...

Form Devices team designs Point as a house sitter

A Scandinavian team "with an international outlook" and good eye for electronics, software and design aims to reach success with what they characterize as "a softer take" on home security. Their device is one where guests can feel less uncomfortable about keeping surveillance cameras in the home. That is the "point" of Point, a smart house sitter from the startup Form Devices.
Man pleads guilty in New York cyber...

Man pleads guilty in New York cybercrime case

A California man has pleaded guilty in New York City for his role marketing malware that federal authorities say infected more than a half-million computers worldwide.
Judge approves $450 mn deal in Appl...

Judge approves $450 mn deal in Apple ebook suit

A US judge signed off on Apple's $450 million legal deal to compensate consumers harmed by an illegal price-fixing conspiracy for electronic books.
NASA issues 'remastered' view of Ju...

NASA issues 'remastered' view of Jupiter's moon Europa

(Phys.org) ?Scientists have produced a new version of what is perhaps NASA's best view of Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. The mosaic of color images was obtained in the late 1990s by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. This is the first time that NASA is publishing a version of the scene produced using modern image processing techniques.
Dish restores Turner channels to li...

Dish restores Turner channels to lineup

Turner Broadcasting channels such as Cartoon Network and CNN are back on the Dish network after being dropped from the satellite TV provider's lineup during contract talks.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

How Doctors Determine the Moment of...

How Doctors Determine the Moment of Death [Excerpt]

The definition of death is hazy but important for medical decisions, explains Harvard neurologist Allan Ropper in the new book Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Day in the Life of an Ebola Worke...

A Day in the Life of an Ebola Worker

Denial, violence and fear make it difficult to stamp out Ebola in west Africa -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Electron Beam Points to Origins of ...

Electron Beam Points to Origins of Teotihuacan Stone Faces

New microscope analysis of artifacts from the ancient city also can find fakes in museums -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Artificial Intelligence That Perfor...

Artificial Intelligence That Performs Real Magic Tricks [Video]

AI helps mechanical magicians fool human spectators -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Never Mind Philae?s Topsy-Turvy Tou...

Never Mind Philae?s Topsy-Turvy Touchdown, Its Brief Mission Advances Comet Science

Even the lander’s missteps generated valuable data -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Congress?s ?Rocket Scientist? to Ta...

Congress?s ?Rocket Scientist? to Take Helm of World?s Largest Science Organization

Rep. Rush Holt on science in Congress: “There are some real frustrations. I’ll leave it at that” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Us vs universe: Quantum dance enter...

Us vs universe: Quantum dance enters forbidden zone

Without the Pauli exclusion principle, matter as we know it would not exist. But at low, low temperatures, even this quantum law gives way (full text available to subscribers)
Us vs universe: Hold still while th...

Us vs universe: Hold still while the Earth trembles

In the hunt for gravitational waves, tiny tremors set a limit on how sensitive any ground-based detector can be ? so we've just got to go off-world (full text available to subscribers)
Zoologger: tickly kiss turns on hai...

Zoologger: tickly kiss turns on hairy-mouthed spiders

The males of this spider species evolved a trick to make females more likely to let them father their offspring – tickling them with hairy mouthparts
Today on New Scientist

Today on New Scientist

All the latest on newscientist.com: how to hear yourself happy, tapeworm in the brain, crowdfunded charity, smartwatch predicts seizures and more
What's behind snowmageddon that hit...

What's behind snowmageddon that hit the US this week?

A kink in the jet stream caused by a recent super typhoon over the Pacific is driving freezing temperatures and early snowfall in the US
Saturn's calming nature keeps Earth...

Saturn's calming nature keeps Earth friendly to life

Even slight tweaks to Saturn's orbital plane and distance could have put Earth on a comet-like path around the sun – and ejected Mars from the solar system

NY times.com Science

Willy Burgdorfer, Who Found Bacteri...

Willy Burgdorfer, Who Found Bacteria That Cause Lyme Disease, Is Dead at 89

Dr. Burgdorfer?s familiar finding while conducting tick surgery solved the mysteries of an ailment that had affected scores of people.
E.P.A. Postpones Setting Standards ...

E.P.A. Postpones Setting Standards for Biofuel Blends

The agency?s move comes in response to a glut in the domestic oil market and significant public comment about the proposed targets.
Dr. Donald F. Steiner, Diabetes Res...

Dr. Donald F. Steiner, Diabetes Researcher, Dies at 84

Dr. Steiner, whose discoveries were used by insulin manufacturers to improve their products, wrote hundreds of articles as a professor at the University of Chicago.
Officials Revise Goals on Containin...

Officials Revise Goals on Containing Ebola After Signs of Wider Exposure in Mali

The leaders of the United Nations and the World Health Organization said nearly 500 people in Mali and Guinea had been exposed to a sickened imam who had been misdiagnosed.
Dot Earth Blog: It?s Time for Obama...

Dot Earth Blog: It?s Time for Obama to Tighten Rules on Gas Leaks

An array of environmental groups have endorsed ways the Obama administration can cost-effectively cut leaks of methane from gas and oil facilities.
F.D.A. Approves Hysingla, a Powerfu...

F.D.A. Approves Hysingla, a Powerful Painkiller

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a long-acting opioid painkiller that contains pure hydrocodone, which some addiction experts fear will be abused.

Science Daily

How the hummingbird achieves its ae...

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds. Now, the most detailed, three-dimensional aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight conducted to date has definitively demonstrated that the hummingbird achieves its nimble aerobatic abilities through a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to other birds.
Theater arts research offers insigh...

Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of social robots

Researchers have provided insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots.
Rejecting unsuitable suitors is eas...

Rejecting unsuitable suitors is easier said than done

Rejecting unsuitable romantic partners is easy in hypothetical situations, but not so when considering a face-to-face proposition, a new study shows. ?When actually faced with a potential date, we don't like to reject a person and make them feel bad, which is not necessarily something that people anticipate when they imagine making these choices,? says the study?s lead researcher.
New terahertz device could strength...

New terahertz device could strengthen security

We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
Self-regulation intervention boosts...

Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows

An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study shows. Self-regulation skills -- the skills that help children pay attention, follow directions, stay on task and persist through difficulty -- are critical to a child's success in kindergarten and beyond, said a co-author of the new study.
Anti-HIV medicines can cause damage...

Anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts, research shows

New research raises concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves. The study shows that while the HIV medications have been successful in helping to prevent the transmission of the virus from mother to infant, they are associated with persistently impaired development of heart muscle and reduced heart performance in non-HIV-infected children whose mothers received the medicines years earlier.

Eureka Alert

Four outstanding early-career journ...

Four outstanding early-career journalists from China and India named EurekAlert! Fellows

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Four outstanding early-career science journalists from India and China have been named winners of the 2015 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific organization, which publishes the Science family of journals.
Theater arts research offers insigh...

Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of robots

(University of Texas at Arlington) UT Arlington Theatre Arts research provides insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots.
Self-regulation intervention boosts...

Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows

(Oregon State University) An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study from Oregon State University shows.
HHS, APIC, and SHEA present 2014 Pa...

HHS, APIC, and SHEA present 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) The US Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections.
Obesity-attributable absenteeism am...

Obesity-attributable absenteeism among US workers costs the nation more than $8 billion annually

(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Obesity costs the US $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace -- more than 9 percent of all absenteeism costs. The consequences of obesity among the working population go beyond healthcare and create a financial challenge not only for the nation but for individual states as well. The study is the first to provide state-level estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among working adults in the US.
UK rises to 4th most entrepreneuria...

UK rises to 4th most entrepreneurial economy in the world

(Imperial College London) The UK has become Europe's most entrepreneurial economy and has climbed five places to fourth globally, according to the 2015 edition of the Global Entrepreneurship Index released today.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

'Underwater Pompeii' found off Gree...

'Underwater Pompeii' found off Greek island

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a small settlement at the bottom of the ocean near Delos. The ancient ruins, which are located just 6ft u...
Loch Ness sees spate of monster sig...

Loch Ness sees spate of monster sightings

A recent increase in Loch Ness Monster reports has been attributed to debris from a nearby forest. After 18 months of no sightings at all there has be...
Ancient Egyptian book of spells dec...

Ancient Egyptian book of spells deciphered

Researchers have succeeded in interpreting a 1,300-year-old handbook full of invocations and spells. The 'Handbook of Ritual Power', which is written ...
Boy recalls memories of past life a...

Boy recalls memories of past life as a Marine

A four-year-old from Virginia claims to possess memories of his life as a Marine who died in 1983. Andrew Lucas came out with the startling revelation...
Bigfoot put forward as 'endangered ...

Bigfoot put forward as 'endangered species'

A motel operator in New York State is seeking to have Bigfoot added to a local endangered species list. Despite the controversy surrounding the Bigfoo...
New 40-seat 'Bio-Bus' runs on human...

New 40-seat 'Bio-Bus' runs on human waste

The UK has launched a new type of environmentally friendly bus that runs exclusively on waste products. The humorously nicknamed 'poo bus' runs on bio...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

The secret of fast runners: symmetr...

The secret of fast runners: symmetry

Science had shown that animals and people with symmetrical bodies tend to be stronger and healthier. Now researchers find they can predict the best sprinters by measuring the top runners? knees.
Wind power is looking up ? to the c...

Wind power is looking up ? to the clouds

Placing wind turbines high in the sky could let them harvest power from the faster, more reliable winds found at altitude.
Questions for Wind Power Is Looking...

Questions for Wind Power Is Looking to the Clouds

Classroom questions for Wind power is looking up ? to the clouds.
Lightning strikes will surge with c...

Lightning strikes will surge with climate change

Warming temperatures will lead to 50 percent more lightning strikes across the 48 U.S. states in the next century, researchers report. That increase could lead to more warming, more fires and even more deaths.
Artificial sweeteners pollute strea...

Artificial sweeteners pollute streams

Fake sugars sweeten foods without adding calories. But most pass right through the body, down the toilet, into water treatment plants ? and from there, right into lakes and streams.
New particle may help probe stronge...

New particle may help probe strongest force in the universe

A newfound subatomic particle should allow scientists to better understand the strong force that holds together the nucleus of every atom.

PopSci

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