Discovery

It's a Twofer! Eggplants and Potato...

It's a Twofer! Eggplants and Potatoes in One Plant

It's an eggplant. It's a potato plant. It's both! Continue reading ?
Why Did This Mysterious Crack Appea...

Why Did This Mysterious Crack Appear in Michigan?

A strange and sudden buckling of the earth in Michigan five years ago is now being explained as a limestone bulge. Continue reading ?
Climate Change May Delay Flights

Climate Change May Delay Flights

A new model predicts that warming will speed up the jet stream -- slowing flights coming from Europe to the US East Coast.
Arctic Warms, Antarctic Ice Shelves...

Arctic Warms, Antarctic Ice Shelves Weaken

Low levels of Arctic sea ice and melting Antarctic glaciers and ice shelves are cause for concern. Continue reading ?
Coal Mining Has Flattened Appalachi...

Coal Mining Has Flattened Appalachia by 40 Percent

Knocking the tops off mountains also has altered water flow and made it more susceptible to pollution. Continue reading ?
Fossilized Pollen Reveals Climate C...

Fossilized Pollen Reveals Climate Clues

Fossilized pollen stored inside stalagmites could provide answers about how Earth's climate changed over millions of years. ?

Yahoo Science

World's top scientists pledge to sh...

World's top scientists pledge to share all findings to fight Zika

A health technician analyzes a blood sample from a patient bitten by a mosquito at the National Institute of Health in LimaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Thirty of the world's leading scientific research institutions, journals and funders have pledged to share for free all data and expertise on Zika to speed up the fight against an outbreak of the viral disease spreading across the Americas. Specialists welcomed the initiative, saying it showed how the global health community had learned crucial lessons from West Africa's Ebola epidemic, which killed more than 11,300 people and saw scientists scrambling to conduct research to help in the development of potential treatments and vaccines. Zika, a viral disease carried by mosquitoes, is causing international alarm as an outbreak in Brazil has now spread through much of the Americas.

Researchers find new Zika clues to ...

Researchers find new Zika clues to birth defect in fetus study

Daniele Santos holds her son Juan Pedro who is 2-months old and born with microcephaly at their house in RecifeBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Researchers on Wednesday reported new evidence strengthening the association between Zika virus and a spike in birth defects, citing the presence of the virus in the brain of an aborted fetus of a European woman who became pregnant while living in Brazil. An autopsy of the fetus showed microcephaly or small head size, as well as severe brain injury and high levels of the Zika virus in fetal brain tissues, exceeding levels of the virus typically found in blood samples, researchers in Slovenia from the University Medical Center in Ljubljana reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings help "strengthen the biologic association" between Zika virus infection and microcephaly, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, wrote in an editorial that accompanied the paper.

Maths link to future locust dispers...

Maths link to future locust dispersal

A mathematical model of locust swarms could help in the development of new strategies to control their devastating migration, according to British researchers. Mathematicians at the universities of Bath, Warwick, and Manchester analyzed the movements of different group sizes of locusts that had been filmed by colleagues at the University of Adelaide. By studying the interactions between individual locusts they were able to create a mathematical model mimicking the pest's collective behavior.
Indian scientists express doubt ove...

Indian scientists express doubt over meteorite death attribution

By Andrew MacAskill NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Indian scientists have expressed doubt that a man in the southern state of Tamil Nadu was the first person to have been confirmed killed by a meteorite strike, as the state's top official has declared. "It cannot be a meteorite," he said.
Genome offers clues on thwarting re...

Genome offers clues on thwarting reviled, disease-carrying ticks

A deer tick, or blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is seen on a blade of grass in this undated picture from the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have unlocked the genetic secrets of one of the least-loved creatures around, the tick species that spreads Lyme disease, in research that may lead to new methods to control these diminutive arachnids that dine on blood. The researchers said on Tuesday they have sequenced the genome of Ixodes scapularis, known as the deer tick or blacklegged tick, which transmits Lyme and other diseases by chomping through the skin of people and animals and releasing infected saliva as they devour blood. "They are so persistent, resilient and tenacious," said Purdue University entomologist Catherine Hill, who led the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

What Caused This Weird Crack to App...

What Caused This Weird Crack to Appear in Michigan?

What Caused This Weird Crack to Appear in Michigan?A strange and sudden buckling of the earth in Michigan five years ago is now being explained as a limestone bulge, researchers reported today (Feb. 9). The upheaved rock and soil was discovered after a deep boom thundered through the forest near Birch Creek on Michigan's Upper Peninsula, north of Menominee.

Physorg.com

Eagles and agriculture coexist in S...

Eagles and agriculture coexist in South Africa

To biologists' surprise, an eagle population living in a South African landscape dominated by agriculture appears to be thriving, according to a new paper in The Condor: Ornithological Applications?even out-performing their neighbors in undeveloped mountain habitat.
Nest size variation not related to ...

Nest size variation not related to breeding success

Contrary to expectations, the size of the Blue Tits' nests is unrelated to their breeding success. The researchers behind a forthcoming study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances spent 18 years making more than 1,200 measurements of Blue Tit nests in southern France and found that bigger nests don't produce better birds after all.
Why emojis are a no-brainer for dig...

Why emojis are a no-brainer for digital communication

When the Oxford English Dictionary declared an emoji its 2015 word of the year, it was a bit of a head-scratcher.
Rwanda hopes to use drones to deliv...

Rwanda hopes to use drones to deliver medical supplies

Rwanda's government has signed an agreement with a U.S.-based robotics company to build infrastructure for drones that would deliver medical supplies to health facilities across the country.
Tesla's 4Q net loss doubles

Tesla's 4Q net loss doubles

Electric car maker Tesla Motors says its net loss more than doubled to $320 million in the fourth quarter, hurt by lower-than-planned production of its new Model X SUV.
For virtual reality pioneers, no ru...

For virtual reality pioneers, no rush to succeed in 2016

Palmer Luckey doesn't just want to sell a bunch of virtual reality headsets. He wants buyers to use them every day.

PBS

Explore North America

Explore North America

Trek across this interactive map, collecting geological clues that tell the story of our continent.
Towers of Chalk in Kansas

Towers of Chalk in Kansas

Amidst the flat plains of Kansas are the gorgeous remains of an ancient inland sea.
How Vultures Can Eat Rotten Meat

How Vultures Can Eat Rotten Meat

Why don't vultures get food poisoning?
Making North America: Origins

Making North America: Origins

Experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over billions of years.
North America Sky Tour

North America Sky Tour

Fly coast to coast to see highlights of how North America took the shape it is today.
A Labyrinth of Lava

A Labyrinth of Lava

The big island of Hawaii is shot through with an underground labyrinth carved out by lava.

Scientific American

Drinking Causes Gut Microbe Imbalan...

Drinking Causes Gut Microbe Imbalance Linked to Liver Disease

In addition to damaging the the organ directly, alcohol weakens naturally produced antibiotics, leaving the liver exposed to bacteria and disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How to Hunt for Gravitational Waves...

How to Hunt for Gravitational Waves [Slide Show]

Various experiments seek different versions of this highly sought-after phenomenon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Brain Activity for Attention and Me...

Brain Activity for Attention and Memory Tasks Changes with the Seasons

New research shows brain function associated with attention peaks during the summer and dips in winter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Single Concussion May Triple the ...

A Single Concussion May Triple the Long-Term Risk of Suicide

A new study of mild concussions in Canadian adults suggests the risks are even higher for recreational injuries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
GPS and the World's First "Space Wa...

GPS and the World's First "Space War"

Satellite-based navigation proved its mettle during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, leading to what some say is an overdependence on “jammable” GPS technology -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why We Shouldn't Quarantine Travele...

Why We Shouldn't Quarantine Travelers Because of Zika

Contrary to some Republican presidential candidates, public health experts say there should not be any travel or trade restrictions because of the virus  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Whole Zika genome recovered from br...

Whole Zika genome recovered from brain of baby with microcephaly

The results of an autopsy offer compelling evidence of a link between the virus and the birth defects
Belief in punitive gods linked with...

Belief in punitive gods linked with expansion of human societies

People who believe in a moralistic god are more likely to help distant strangers who share their religion, which may explain the evolution of complex societies
Einstein?s last theory confirmed? A...

Einstein?s last theory confirmed? A guide to gravitational waves

We're expecting huge physics news tomorrow ? get ahead of the crowd with our primer on gravitational waves
$19 billion NASA budget for 2017 st...

$19 billion NASA budget for 2017 still not enough to get to Mars

The 2017 budget, still to be approved by US Congress, is down $260 million on 2016 and doesn't provide enough funding for crewed Mars missions, say critics
First fully approved ?off the shelf...

First fully approved ?off the shelf? stem cells launch in Japan

The long anticipated age of the stem cell is upon us. Temcell prevents organ transplants attacking their hosts but will be followed by therapies for more common problems
?Dark sunshine? could illuminate th...

?Dark sunshine? could illuminate the search for dark matter

If there?s dark matter hiding in our sun, it could be giving off dark photons. The best part is we already have a detector in space that could spot them

NY times.com Science

Assisted Suicide Study Questions It...

Assisted Suicide Study Questions Its Use for Mentally Ill

Researchers who looked at doctor-assisted deaths in the Netherlands found that some patients had declined treatment that might have helped.
Supreme Court?s Blow to Emissions E...

Supreme Court?s Blow to Emissions Efforts May Imperil Paris Climate Accord

Polluters like China and India may balk at following through on the Paris Agreement on cutting emissions if the United States fails to carry out strong policies.
That Wasn?t a Meteorite That Killed...

That Wasn?t a Meteorite That Killed a Man in India, NASA Says

A ?land-based? explosion was the likely cause, not an object from space, which would have been a first of sorts in recorded history.
Johns Hopkins to Perform First H.I....

Johns Hopkins to Perform First H.I.V.-Positive Organ Transplants in U.S.

The hospital said it would become the first in the nation to perform kidney and liver transplants between H.I.V.-positive donors and H.I.V.-positive patients.
Edgar D. Mitchell, Sixth Moonwalkin...

Edgar D. Mitchell, Sixth Moonwalking Astronaut, Dies at 85

Commander Mitchell, a member of NASA?s first lunar mission devoted exclusively to scientific research, Apollo 14, spent just over nine hours on the moon on two moonwalks.
Henry S. F. Cooper Jr., Space Repor...

Henry S. F. Cooper Jr., Space Reporter With Literary Lineage, Dies at 82

Mr. Cooper, a descendant of James Fenimore Cooper, was an author, a writer for The New Yorker and the bulletin editor for the Century Association.

Science Daily

Research finds new target in search...

Research finds new target in search for why statin drugs sometimes cause problems for some patients

Statin drugs interact with a gap junction protein called GJC3 that releases ATP, a major signaling molecule for inflammation in the body, new research shows. This discovery provides a significant new target in the search for why statin drugs can sometimes cause harmful effects such as muscle toxicity in some patients.
Forget butterflies and bees, box li...

Forget butterflies and bees, box like an ant

Boxer Muhammad Ali famously declared his intent to 'float like a butterfly and sting like a bee,' but perhaps boxers should look to another type of insect for inspiration: the trap-jaw ant. In a new study, entomologists measured the speed at which different species of trap-jaw ants strike one another during antenna-boxing bouts.
Research uncovers more inherited ge...

Research uncovers more inherited genetic mutations linked to ovarian cancer

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. A recent publication documents the efforts of a team of researchers to determine if inherited genetic mutations other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 can also put a woman at risk of developing these diseases.
Study challenges widely accepted th...

Study challenges widely accepted theory of Yellowstone formation

Understanding the complex geological processes that form supervolcanoes could ultimately help geologists determine what triggers their eruptions. A new study using an advanced computer model casts doubt on previously held theories about the Yellowstone supervolcano's origins, adding to the mystery of Yellowstone's formation.
Healing the soil

Healing the soil

Chicago's history of industrialization and urbanization left its mark on the soil. Soil acts as a sponge, and can host contaminants for years. In Chicago, the waste from industrial manufacturing causes undesirable toxic organic chemicals, heavy metals, and other chemicals to linger in the soil. A non-profit youth development center hopes to repurpose the lots into useful spaces for the community. However, the poor quality soils in the lots create challenges.
Starting age of marijuana use may h...

Starting age of marijuana use may have long-term effects on brain development

The age at which an adolescent begins using marijuana may affect typical brain development, according to researchers. Scientists describe how marijuana use, and the age at which use is initiated, may adversely alter brain structures that underlie higher order thinking.

Eureka Alert

Why you may skimp on your Valentine...

Why you may skimp on your Valentine's Day gift

(University of Chicago Booth School of Business) In the study, 'The Friendly Taking Effect: How Interpersonal Closeness Leads to Seemingly Selfish Yet Jointly Maximizing Choice,' Chicago Booth researchers find that people are more likely to take from a close other than a distant other. In a series of studies, the researchers determine that this tendency is rooted in a friendly intention of trying to maximize the total benefits for the pair, or the so-called 'self-other collective.'
Research into critical national iss...

Research into critical national issues at forefront of NSF's FY2017 budget request

(National Science Foundation) National Science Foundation (NSF) Director France A. Córdova today outlined how President Obama's fiscal year (FY) 2017 request for NSF supports research into critical national issues, including clean energy technologies, food sustainability, disaster response and education. The FY2017 budget requests $8 billion, an increase of about 6.7 percent, or about $500 million, over the enacted FY2016 budget.
Fostering commercialization to impr...

Fostering commercialization to improve health and create jobs in Washington

(Life Sciences Discovery Fund) A new technology commercialization program will launch this spring to help Washington's life sciences innovators move their promising ideas into the hands of providers and patients, thanks to a $1.8 million 'ecosystem' award from the state's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF).
Enrichment program introduces Bosto...

Enrichment program introduces Boston undergraduates to careers in medicine or research

(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Twenty-six aspiring undergraduates experienced life as medical students or research scientists during the fourth Tufts University School of Medicine/University of Massachusetts Boston Enrichment program. The undergraduates took part in an intensive curriculum that ran for three weeks at Tufts.
Dr. Gail D'Onofrio & Dr. David Fiel...

Dr. Gail D'Onofrio & Dr. David Fiellin earn Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation Award

(Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation) Gail D'Onofrio, M.D., Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine and David Fiellin, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine have earned the latest Dan Anderson Research Award for their study examining the impact of buprenorphine treatment on treatment engagement and opioid use outcomes among opioid dependent patients admitted to the emergency department (ED). The award is sponsored by the Butler Center for Research at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation.
Overconfidence, loss aversion are k...

Overconfidence, loss aversion are key predictors for investment mistakes

(University of Missouri-Columbia) In a new study, a personal financial planning expert from the University of Missouri has identified several risk factors for people who are more likely to make investment mistakes during a down market.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Taxi drivers pick up 'phantom fares...

Taxi drivers pick up 'phantom fares' in Japan

Several cab drivers have reported having strange experiences in the area hit by the 2011 tsunami. It might sound like something out of a book of class...
Birds of prey are deliberately star...

Birds of prey are deliberately starting fires

Falcons and kites in Australia have been starting bush fires in an effort to smoke out small animals. While nobody has yet been able to record footage...
Bacteria are able to see the world ...

Bacteria are able to see the world like we do

Scientists have revealed that bacteria are not that dissimilar to us when it comes to sensing light. These microscopic organisms, which can be found a...
'Virgin birth' bamboo shark lays tw...

'Virgin birth' bamboo shark lays two eggs

A female shark at a UK sea life center has laid two eggs despite having had no contact with a male. The white-spotted bamboo shark, which arrived at t...
Notorious Indiana 'hell house' is t...

Notorious Indiana 'hell house' is torn down

A house suspected of being haunted by a demonic entity has been demolished following years of activity. The house was previously the home of Latoya Am...
Gravitational waves announcement im...

Gravitational waves announcement imminent

Scientists are set to make a 'major' announcement about gravitational waves this coming Thursday. The hunt for gravitational waves - ripples in the fa...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

PopSci

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Science News.org

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