Discovery

158-Year-Old Redwood May Be UK's Ol...

158-Year-Old Redwood May Be UK's Oldest Xmas Tree

A cultural agency in the United Kingdom says it has discovered the oldest living Christmas tree in all of Britain.
Weirdest Weather of 2014: Photos

Weirdest Weather of 2014: Photos

If you were interested in freaky weather, 2014 had it all: snow in full effect, super storms and a drought for the ages.
Most of Alaska's Permafrost Could M...

Most of Alaska's Permafrost Could Melt This Century

Permafrost in Alaska's iconic Denali National Park and other areas could all but disappear by the end of this century, new research suggests.
Ancient Tributes to the Winter Sols...

Ancient Tributes to the Winter Solstice

Mysterious signs of worshiping of the winter solstice crop up around the world.
Smelly Corpse Flower Set to Bloom

Smelly Corpse Flower Set to Bloom

In a matter of days, perhaps hours, a rare corpse flower will bloom in upstate New York. True to its name, the plant is expected to unleash a stench like rotting flesh.
Bubbles Could Provide Energy Breakt...

Bubbles Could Provide Energy Breakthrough

Studying how bubbles work could lead to more efficient power stations. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Disgraced Japan researcher fails to...

Disgraced Japan researcher fails to replicate 'game changing' stem cell results

Haruko Obokata, a researcher at semi-governmental research institute RIKEN, lowers her eyes during a news conference in OsakaBy Elaine Lies TOKYO (Reuters) - A disgraced Japanese researcher has failed to replicate results hailed as a potential breakthrough in stem-cell treatment and efforts to do so will be abandoned, officials at her research institute said on Friday. The scandal involving the research, which detailed simple ways to reprogram mature cells back to an embryonic-like state, eventually led to the retraction of papers published in the influential journal Nature and tarnished the reputation of Japanese scientific research. ...

Europe recommends approval for firs...

Europe recommends approval for first stem-cell therapy

LONDON (Reuters) - European regulators have recommended approval of the first medicine containing stem cells to treat a rare condition caused by burns to the eye. The European Medicines Agency said on Friday that Holoclar, from privately held Italian company Chiesi, had been given a green light for moderate to severe limbal stem cell deficiency due to physical or chemical burns. Left untreated, the condition can result in blindness. Holoclar is a living tissue product made from a biopsy taken from a small undamaged area of the patient?s cornea and grown in the laboratory using cell culture. ...
Songbirds fly coop long before torn...

Songbirds fly coop long before tornadoes arrive in Tennessee

Henry Streby holds a male golden-winged warbler and the geolocator that the bird carried in the Cumberland Mountains of TennesseeBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - You might want to be careful about who you call a birdbrain. Some of our feathered friends exhibit powers of perception that put humans to shame. Scientists said on Thursday that little songbirds known as golden-winged warblers fled their nesting grounds in Tennessee up to two days before the arrival of a fierce storm system that unleashed 84 tornadoes in southern U.S. states in April. The researchers said the birds were apparently alerted to the danger by sounds at frequencies below the range of human hearing. ...

SpaceX delays planned cargo run to ...

SpaceX delays planned cargo run to space station to early January

Falcon 9 rocket is launched by Space Exploration Technologies on its fourth cargo resupply service mission to the International Space Station, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in FloridaCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Space Exploration Technologies is delaying the planned launch on Friday of an unmanned Falcon 9 rocket, which will carry a cargo ship to the International Space Station for NASA, to early January, officials said on Thursday. Liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida had been planned for 1:22 p.m. EST, but an undisclosed technical issue with the rocket prompted SpaceX, as the company is known, to postpone the flight until Jan 6. The problem surfaced during routine prelaunch test firing of the rocket?s engines, SpaceX spokesman John Taylor said. ...

India tests its heaviest space laun...

India tests its heaviest space launch vehicle, eyes global market

By Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India's space agency successfully tested on Thursday its most powerful satellite launch vehicle that can put heavier payloads into space, and, it hopes, win India a bigger slice of the $300 billion global space industry. The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) also checked the working of an unmanned crew module on the vehicle, which could give the agency the option of manned missions. ...
Déjà Vu All Over Again: This Man Re...

Déjà Vu All Over Again: This Man Relived Every New Moment

Trapped in a time loop: That's how one man felt because of his recurring déjà vu episodes. Unlike the vague, fleeting sensation most people experience in déjà vu, his episodes were persistent and long. "Rather than simply the unsettling feelings of familiarity which are normally associated with déjà vu, he complained that it felt like he was actually retrieving previous experiences from memory, not just finding them familiar," the researchers said. What made the case even more peculiar was that the man didn't suffer from any of the neurological conditions previously reported in people who experience frequent déjà vu episodes.

Physorg.com

Coral reveals long-term link betwee...

Coral reveals long-term link between Pacific winds, global climate

New research indicates that shifts in Pacific trade winds played a key role in twentieth century climate variation, a sign that they may again be influencing global temperatures.
Piezoelectricity in 2-D semiconduct...

Piezoelectricity in 2-D semiconductor holds promise for future MEMS

A door has been opened to low-power off/on switches in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectronic devices, as well as ultrasensitive bio-sensors, with the first observation of piezoelectricity in a free standing two-dimensional semiconductor by a team of researchers with the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
Pluto.TV offers curated online vide...

Pluto.TV offers curated online videos as alternative to YouTube, TV

Ilya Pozin's 2-year-old daughter wasn't about to abandon daddy's comfortable lap. But Pozin had to manage his successful e-cards company, so he'd entertain Paisley in his home office by playing cartoons and educational videos off YouTube on a second monitor.
The psychology of gift-giving and r...

The psychology of gift-giving and receiving

Gift exchanges can reveal how people think about others, what they value and enjoy, and how they build and maintain relationships. Researchers are exploring various aspects of gift-giving and receiving, such as how givers choose gifts, how gifts are used by recipients, and how gifts impact the relationship between givers and receivers.
Electronic gadget for shaking hands...

Electronic gadget for shaking hands over the Internet

Takanori Miyoshi at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, has developed an innovative gadget that enables people to 'shake hands' over the Internet, irrespective of their location.
221 new species described by the Ca...

221 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2014

In 2014, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added a whopping 221 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 110 ants, 16 beetles, three spiders, 28 fishes, 24 sea slugs, two marine worms, 9 barnacles, two octocorals, 25 plants, one waterbear, and one tiny mammal. More than a dozen Academy scientists?along with several dozen international collaborators?described the discoveries.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

A New Way to Reach Mars Safely, Any...

A New Way to Reach Mars Safely, Anytime and on the Cheap

Ballistic capture, a low-energy method that has coasted spacecraft into lunar orbit, could help humanity visit the Red Planet much more often -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Monkey See, Monkey Speak

Monkey See, Monkey Speak

Scientists use language and logic to translate monkey sounds into English and develop linguistic rules for primate dialects. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Cl...

The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Clues about Disease

A “deep-learning” algorithm shines a light on mutations in once obscure areas of the genome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
For Sale: ?Your Name Here? in a Pre...

For Sale: ?Your Name Here? in a Prestigious Science Journal

An investigation into some scientific papers finds worrying irregularities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Faster Way to Diagnose Antibiotic...

A Faster Way to Diagnose Antibiotic Resistance

Novel test could slash wait time and curb inappropriate prescriptions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How Congress Snuck Changes to U.S. ...

How Congress Snuck Changes to U.S. Environmental Policy into the New Budget Bill

The $1-trillion bill keeps agencies from acting on clean air and water and energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Cuban know-how may aid US storm and...

Cuban know-how may aid US storm and climate resilience

Amidst a new spirit of cooperation, Cuban research could help address key threats facing the US, says a champion of cross-border scientific cooperation
Why are we so eager to embrace cons...

Why are we so eager to embrace conspiracy theories?

A staggering number of people believe the unbelievable. How should we respond, ask political scientists Eric Oliver and Tom Wood
Racing refraction: Who reached the ...

Racing refraction: Who reached the North Pole first?

Peary or Cook? The bending of sunlight has helped to reveal who bent the truth in a century-old debate about which explorer was the first to the North Pole (full text available to subscribers)
The real Oompa-Loompas: Microbes th...

The real Oompa-Loompas: Microbes that make chocolate

Fungi, bacteria and yeasts are the unsung heroes of chocolate production. Managing these little helpers better could keep the future for chocoholics sweet (full text available to subscribers)
Pearls of wisdom: The truth behind ...

Pearls of wisdom: The truth behind common sayings

A watched pot never boils and the early bird does catch the worm, but you can teach old dogs new tricks (full text available to subscribers)
FBI says North Korea hacked Sony ? ...

FBI says North Korea hacked Sony ? what's the proof?

The FBI says North Korea forced Sony to cancel the release of Seth Rogan's film The Interview. But security experts are sceptical

NY times.com Science

Dot Earth Blog: A Postcard from the...

Dot Earth Blog: A Postcard from the Western Amazon, on Peril and Hope

A longtime resident of Brazil?s westernmost Amazon state reflects on forests, martyrs and the future.
Protecting a Home Where the Puffer ...

Protecting a Home Where the Puffer Fish Roam in Biscayne National Park

A dispute over the possibility of a no-fishing zone in Biscayne National Park off the coast of Florida has raised contrasts with hunting bans on federal land.
Energy-Storage Plans Gain Ground in...

Energy-Storage Plans Gain Ground in California

Southern California Edison plans to retire some power plants and replace them with storage ? including conventional batteries and giant ice packs ? as well as other power generators.
Fuel Rods Are Removed From Damaged ...

Fuel Rods Are Removed From Damaged Fukushima Reactor

Tokyo Electric Power Company passed one milestone, but faces the far more challenging task of removing the ruined fuel cores from the three reactors that melted down.
Owners of Chemical Firm Charged in ...

Owners of Chemical Firm Charged in Elk River Spill in West Virginia

Four owners and operators of Freedom Industries were indicted in the January leak that cut off drinking water to hundreds of thousands of residents.
National Briefing | Midwest: Protec...

National Briefing | Midwest: Protection Reinstated for Gray Wolves

A federal judge on Friday threw out an Obama administration decision to remove gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region from the endangered species list.

Science Daily

Televised medical talk shows: Healt...

Televised medical talk shows: Health education or entertainment?

Millions of viewers around the world watch the televised medical talk programs 'The Dr. Oz Show' and 'The Doctors' for medical advice, but how valuable are the recommendations they receive? In a first of its kind study, researchers have examined the recommendations given on those two shows to see if there is believable evidence to back up the claims presented. The results were revealing.
Polymorphism, bacteria inside us he...

Polymorphism, bacteria inside us help dictate inflammation, antitumor activity

A common polymorphism can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research. The research reveals a more explicit role about the symbiotic relationship humans have with the various bacteria that inhabit our body and their role during tumor progression.
Lost memories might be able to be r...

Lost memories might be able to be restored, suggests research into marine snail

New research indicates that lost memories can be restored, according to new research into a type of marine snail called Aplysia. The findings offer some hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.
First direct evidence that a myster...

First direct evidence that a mysterious phase of matter competes with high-temperature superconductivity

Scientists have found the first direct evidence that a mysterious phase of matter known as the "pseudogap" competes with high-temperature superconductivity, robbing it of electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.
New species found in the deepest tr...

New species found in the deepest trench on Earth

Researchers have returned from the first detailed study of the Mariana Trench aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor. The expedition set many new records, including the deepest rock samples ever collected and the discovery of new fish species at the greatest depths ever recorded.
Atom-thick CCD could capture images

Atom-thick CCD could capture images

An atomically thin material may lead to the thinnest-ever imaging platform. Synthetic two-dimensional materials based on metal chalcogenide compounds could be the basis for superthin devices.

Eureka Alert

Disadvantaged men more likely to do...

Disadvantaged men more likely to do 'women's work' reveals new study

(University of Exeter) New research has revealed that men who are disabled and from an ethnic minority are significantly more likely to do jobs traditionally associated with women.
Alcohol apps aimed at young

Alcohol apps aimed at young

(James Cook University) Apps with names like 'Let's get Wasted!' and 'Drink Thin' have led a James Cook University Professor to call for government action on alcohol advertising on mobile devices.
IMF lending undermined healthcare p...

IMF lending undermined healthcare provision in Ebola-stricken West Africa

(University of Cambridge) Researchers criticize reforms advocated by the IMF for chronically under-funded and insufficiently staffed health systems in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. They say these policies contributed to 'lack of preparedness' of West African health systems to cope with disease and emergencies such as Ebola.
Securing future food supply for the...

Securing future food supply for the developing world

(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) An interdisciplinary research project led by FAU scientists aims to determine ways to increase the total biomass and starch yield of the cassava plant. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which combats disease, hunger and poverty in the developing world, has awarded $10 million in funding over a five-year period to the project, entitled 'Metabolic engineering of carbon pathways to enhance yield of root and tuber crops.'
National Academy of Inventors publi...

National Academy of Inventors publishes annual meeting proceedings

(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) The current special issue of Technology and Innovation is devoted to presentations from the Third Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors, which was held March 6-7, 2014, at the headquarters of the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va., and includes select articles from the conference, as well as a general section related to pharmacy and nanotechnology, and an additional manuscript discussing innovation in chemistry.
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grants ...

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grants CMU $2 million to transform education in Humanities

(Carnegie Mellon University) The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon University a five-year, $2 million grant to use technology-enhanced learning to transform and enhance graduate education in the humanities. With a well-established legacy of pioneering technology-enhanced learning and through its Simon Initiative, a strategic, university-wide commitment to use technology-enhanced learning to improve learning outcomes for all students, Carnegie Mellon is uniquely positioned to advance digital scholarship and technology-enhanced learning in the humanities.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Nukes could be used to destroy aste...

Nukes could be used to destroy asteroids

The ultimate weapons of mass destruction could one day save us from complete annihilation. For years campaigners have been attempting to encourage wor...
NASA proposes a 'cloud city' above ...

NASA proposes a 'cloud city' above Venus

A future manned mission to Venus could see astronauts piloting blimps around the planet's atmosphere. While most of the recent focus on sending humans...
6,000-year-old camp unearthed at St...

6,000-year-old camp unearthed at Stonehenge

An ancient encampment discovered near the prehistoric monument could rewrite British history. The earliest settlement ever found at the site, the Meso...
Kepler discovers new extrasolar pla...

Kepler discovers new extrasolar planet

NASA's Kepler space telescope has made its first discovery since being crippled by a technical fault. Located 180 light years away in the constellatio...
US Navy deploys underwater robot sh...

US Navy deploys underwater robot shark

The impressive five-foot-long aquatic surveillance robot looks and moves like the real thing. The US Navy has experimented with some unusual technolog...
Former marine spots 'gray creature'...

Former marine spots 'gray creature' in Ohio

The 60-year-old was driving near Carmel when he witnessed a strange entity crossing the road. One of the more unusual cases to have been reported to t...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Spidey sense: Eight-legged pollutio...

Spidey sense: Eight-legged pollution monitors

Spiders that prey on aquatic insects can serve as sentinels that naturally monitor banned chemicals that still pollute many rivers across the United States.
Virus blamed in starfish die-off

Virus blamed in starfish die-off

A virus may explains the deaths of millions of starfish along the Pacific Coast of North America. The deaths affect 20 species. Some of the stricken animals appear to melt into puddles of slime.
Soot fouls subway stations ? and ma...

Soot fouls subway stations ? and maybe lungs

Soot levels in stations for New York City?s electric subway trains exceed the levels outdoors, a new study finds. The underground source of this black carbon: maintenance trains that share the tracks with subway trains. Breathing soot can aggravate asthma and other lung disease.
Nano air pollutants strike a blow t...

Nano air pollutants strike a blow to the brain

Most people think that air pollution poses the biggest risk to our lungs. In fact, pollution hits the brain too, sometimes by traveling a direct route ? through our noses. These tiny pollutants can harm IQ and more.
Questions for Nano Air Pollutants S...

Questions for Nano Air Pollutants Strike a Blow to the Brain

Classroom questions for Nano Air Pollutants Strike a Blow to the Brain
Banned drug reduces brain communica...

Banned drug reduces brain communication

Illegal drugs called ?bath salts? can reduce communications among different brain regions. New research, done in rats, may explain the violent and unpredictable behavior seen in some people using these drugs.

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