Discovery

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading ?
DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What...

DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What Makes Flights Bumpy

Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.
Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinki...

Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinking

Winds, currents and seafloor features may be responsible for keeping Antarctica's sea ice intact.
Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Ch...

Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Chart?

An oppressive heat wave in India led to a record temperature of 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit -- the highest ever in Asia.
Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just ...

Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just $1.50

A four-bedroom bungalow and 416 sheep are all covered by the annual rent. Scenic views available at no additional cost. Continue reading ?
US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed fo...

US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed for Health Violations

One in eight swimming pools in five populous states are closed upon inspection due to dirty and potentially dangerous water, the CDC reported this week. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Oil hovers near six-month high as U...

Oil hovers near six-month high as U.S. stockpile build counters supply fears

Oil hovers near six-month high as U.S. stockpile build counters supply fearsOil prices hovered near six-month highs on Wednesday after data showed U.S. crude stockpiles surged to their highest levels since October 2017, countering fears of tight supply resulting from OPEC output cuts and U.S. sanctions on Venezuela and Iran. Brent crude futures rose 6 cents to settle at $74.57 a barrel. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures were under more pressure from the build in domestic stocks, and ended 41 cents lower at $65.89 a barrel.


Microsoft Sales Top Estimates Amid ...

Microsoft Sales Top Estimates Amid Flurry of Cloud Wins

Microsoft Sales Top Estimates Amid Flurry of Cloud WinsNet income was $8.8 billion, or $1.14 a share, compared with an average analyst estimate of $1 a share, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The fiscal third quarter featured a flurry of large brands, particularly in retail, signing agreements to use Microsoft?s Azure cloud software. Microsoft also is benefiting as more traditional companies that are longtime customers move to the cloud.


FDA: Some tainted versions of blood...

FDA: Some tainted versions of blood pressure drug losartan OK to take

FDA: Some tainted versions of blood pressure drug losartan OK to takeThe FDA will allow some versions of losartan with a carcinogen to be shipped to pharmacies to avert a shortage of the critical medication.


Occidental offers $38 billion for A...

Occidental offers $38 billion for Anadarko, topping Chevron

Occidental offers $38 billion for Anadarko, topping ChevronOccidental Petroleum Corp on Wednesday started the first takeover battle for a major oil company in years, offering $38 billion for Anadarko Petroleum Corp, a bid that topped a $33 billion offer by Chevron Corp. Both suitors are offering a premium for Anadarko's holdings in the Permian Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Occidental's surprise $76-per-share bid is valued at $57 billion, including debt.


21-year-old woman arrested for lyin...

21-year-old woman arrested for lying about having kidney cancer

21-year-old woman arrested for lying about having kidney cancerA local club organizing a fundraiser to help Hannah Hume with her medical bills became suspicious about her kidney cancer diagnosis.


Hubble enjoyed a colorful view of t...

Hubble enjoyed a colorful view of the Southern Crab Nebula to celebrate 29 years in space

Hubble enjoyed a colorful view of the Southern Crab Nebula to celebrate 29 years in spaceThe Hubble Space Telescope has provided mankind with some of the most incredible views of space that we've ever seen. It's shown us breathtaking images of distant objects and structures for nearly three decades, and to celebrate the 29th anniversary of its launch NASA took the time to show us some of the best galactic eye candy yet.What you see above is the Southern Crab Nebula, which gets its unique appearance from a pair of stars locked in an incredibly close relationship. Material from one of the stars is regularly spewing out, being drawn in by the gravity of its companion star and filling the gap between both stellar bodies. The material is pushed out into space in a shape that vaguely resembled an hourglass.The two stars, a red giant and a white dwarf, are putting on quite a show for us here on Earth, but at a distance of several thousand light-years away it's possible that the incredible structure has already changed dramatically from what we can see today.NASA explains:> The outflow may only last a few thousand years, a tiny fraction of the lifetime of the system. This means that the outer structure may be just thousands of years old, but the inner hourglass must be a more recent outflow event. The red giant will ultimately collapse to become a white dwarf. After that, the surviving pair of white dwarfs will illuminate a shell of gas called a planetary nebula.This is just one of many images made possible by the venerable Hubble, which launched into space exactly 29 years ago today. It was sent into orbit by the space shuttle Discovery, and after some in-space adjustments to its lens system it has been producing gorgeous images ever since.It has been repaired, augmented, and modified several times during its long stint in space, and it's still one of NASA best tools for observing the cosmos. The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will provide NASA with even more power to peer into space, but it won't replace Hubble outright and we can expect the aging telescope to continue to provide us with views of space for some time.


Physorg.com

Microsoft surges toward trillion-do...

Microsoft surges toward trillion-dollar value as profits rise

Microsoft said profits climbed in the past quarter on its cloud and business services as the US technology giant saw its market value close in on the trillion-dollar mark.
Facebook profit slumps on set-aside...

Facebook profit slumps on set-aside for big US fine

Facebook on Wednesday reported quarterly profit sank 51 percent from a year earlier due to setting aside $3 billion for an anticipated fine from US regulators.
Freshwater fish species richness ha...

Freshwater fish species richness has increased in Ohio River Basin since '60s

The taxonomic and trophic composition of freshwater fishes in the Ohio River Basin has changed significantly in recent decades, possibly due to environmental modifications related to land use and hydrology, according to a study published April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mark Pyron of Ball State University, and colleagues.
Twitter adds way to report voter-tr...

Twitter adds way to report voter-tricking tweets

Twitter on Wednesday began making it easier to report tweets aimed at interfering with people voting, starting first in Europe and India.
Indian court lifts ban on Chinese s...

Indian court lifts ban on Chinese social media app TikTok

An Indian court on Wednesday lifted its ban on Chinese social media video-sharing app TikTok on the condition that the platform popular with teenagers would not be used to host obscene videos.
What the vibrant pigments of bird f...

What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works

A University of Arizona-led research team has shown that evolution is driven by species interaction within a community.

PBS

Using Artificial Intelligence, Scie...

Using Artificial Intelligence, Scientists Translate Brain Signals into Speech

With a ?virtual vocal tract,? researchers might someday be able to help people who have lost the ability to speak.
What Restaurants, and the Rest of U...

What Restaurants, and the Rest of Us, Get Wrong About Food Allergies

Up to one third of restaurant staff hold the mistaken belief that drinking cold water can dilute an allergic response to food.
Ancient Dead Sea Microbes Consumed ...

Ancient Dead Sea Microbes Consumed Each Other?s Corpses to Survive

Thousands of years ago, bacteria were faced with a Donner-Party-esque dilemma: consume the dead, or join them.
How This NASA Telescope is Defendin...

How This NASA Telescope is Defending the Earth From Asteroids

The infrared-sensitive telescope, aboard an Earth-orbiting spacecraft, can detect near-Earth objects by sensing the heat they absorb from the Sun.
Tiny Earthquakes Rattle Southern Ca...

Tiny Earthquakes Rattle Southern California Every Three Minutes. Now, Scientists Have the Tools to Track Them.

A new computer algorithm adds over 1.5 million earthquakes to California?s seismic archives, giving a clear picture of past quakes.
This Score Can Tell You Your Geneti...

This Score Can Tell You Your Genetic Risk for Obesity. Is It Worth Knowing?

There can be a 30-pound weight difference between people with low and high genetic risk. But genes aren?t everything.

Scientific American

Scientists Take a Step Toward Decod...

Scientists Take a Step Toward Decoding Speech from the Brain

New study gets closer to restoring natural communication for those who cannot speak

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Seabird Poop Speeds Up Coral Growth

Seabird Poop Speeds Up Coral Growth

Conservation plans should consider such links between land-based and marine ecosystems

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Did a Meteor from Another Star Stri...

Did a Meteor from Another Star Strike Earth in 2014?

Questionable data clouds the potential discovery of the first known interstellar fireball

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Hurricane Aftermath Leaves Florida ...

Hurricane Aftermath Leaves Florida with Years of Major Wildfire Threat

Tinderboxes of storm-felled trees are a growing concern in the Southeast as climate change also increases fire risks

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Brain Restoration System Explores H...

Brain Restoration System Explores Hazy Territory between Being Dead or Alive

An experiment that restored cellular function to pigs’ brains hours after death holds the potential for advancing neuroscience research

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Notre Dame's Architectural Legacy

Notre Dame's Architectural Legacy

This religious center, cultural icon and UNESCO World Heritage Site is also an engineering marvel

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Robotic tube for surgery autonomous...

Robotic tube for surgery autonomously navigates inside a beating heart

A robotic catheter can move autonomously inside a heart to the location where surgery is required. It has a camera for vision and has been tested in 5 pigs
China?s efforts to cut pollution in...

China?s efforts to cut pollution in Beijing may make it worse overall

Heavy polluting industries are being moved away from Beijing in an attempt to cut air pollution, but this could actually result in more pollution not less
Foragers may have settled in the Am...

Foragers may have settled in the Amazon 10,000 years ago

Human burial sites and evidence of hunting, foraging and a cooking hearth reveal that foragers lived in the Amazon thousands of years earlier than we thought
?Rule-breaking? crab fossils have w...

?Rule-breaking? crab fossils have weird shrimp and lobster features

A newly-discovered type of crab from the Cretaceous period looks like it had the eyes of a larva, the mouth of a shrimp, and the carapace of a lobster
Over 400 languages spoken today may...

Over 400 languages spoken today may have originated in northern China

The Sino-Tibetan languages include Mandarin and Tibetan. Now, a study suggests they originated in northern China, contradicting previous research
Mind-reading device uses AI to turn...

Mind-reading device uses AI to turn brainwaves into audible speech

People's brainwaves have been converted into speech using electrodes on the brain. The method could one day help people speak who have lost the ability

NY times.com Science

These Otters Are Popular Pets in As...

These Otters Are Popular Pets in Asia. That May Be Their Undoing.

Asian small-clawed otters are increasingly popular as novelty pets, particularly in Japan. Now international trade in the species may be banned.
Wary of Chinese Espionage, Houston ...

Wary of Chinese Espionage, Houston Cancer Center Chose to Fire 3 Scientists

The director of the National Institutes of Health said that 55 similar investigations into possible foreign exploitation of American research are happening nationwide.
Global Wealth Gap Would Be Smaller ...

Global Wealth Gap Would Be Smaller Today Without Climate Change, Study Finds

Most of the world?s poor countries are poorer than they would have been had greenhouse gas emissions not altered the climate. In some rich countries, it's the opposite.
Unbuttoned: Hello, Little Microbe. ...

Unbuttoned: Hello, Little Microbe. Doesn?t This Jacket Look Yummy?

Now we can trick tiny bugs into eating our clothing. Consumption is finally a good thing.
David Thouless, 84, Dies; Nobel Lau...

David Thouless, 84, Dies; Nobel Laureate Cast Light on Matter

Using math to explain strange states of matter, like superconductivity, he had a ?transformational? impact on physics, with real-world applications.
A Leading Cause for Wrongful Convic...

A Leading Cause for Wrongful Convictions: Experts Overstating Forensic Results

These three men spent decades in prison as a result of statistical exaggerations. They were among 150 men and women released from prison after their wrongful convictions were overturned in 2018.

Science Daily

Modern analysis of ancient hearths ...

Modern analysis of ancient hearths reveals Neanderthal settlement patterns

Ancient fire remains provide evidence of Neanderthal group mobility and settlement patterns and indicate specific occupation episodes, according to a new study.
No assembly required: Researchers ...

No assembly required: Researchers automate microrobotic designs

Researchers have developed an automated approach that significantly cuts down on, and expands, the types of microrobots they can manufacture.
What the vibrant pigments of bird f...

What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works

Biologists show that evolution is driven by dependency on other species within ecological communities - testing a long-held idea of the late, great George Gaylord Simpson.
Time-restricted eating shows benefi...

Time-restricted eating shows benefits for blood glucose

By restricting the time period during which they could eat, researchers have seen promising results for controlling blood glucose levels in men at risk of type 2 diabetes. In a small study, researchers assessed the effects of time-restricted eating (TRE) in 15 men for one week.
Cleaner, cheaper ammonia: Cheaper f...

Cleaner, cheaper ammonia: Cheaper fertilizer

Ammonia -- a colorless gas essential for things like fertilizer -- can be made by a new process which is far cleaner, easier and cheaper than the current leading method. Researchers use readily available lab equipment, recyclable chemicals and a minimum of energy to produce ammonia. Their Samarium-Water Ammonia Production (SWAP) process promises to scale down ammonia production and improve access to ammonia fertilizer to farmers everywhere.
Immense Pacific coral reef survey s...

Immense Pacific coral reef survey shows green sea turtle populations increasing

Densities of endangered green turtles are increasing in Pacific coral reefs, according to the first comprehensive in-water survey of turtle populations in the Pacific.

Eureka Alert

Elemental old-timer makes the unive...

Elemental old-timer makes the universe look like a toddler

(Rice University) Rice University physicists contributed to the discovery of the longest half-life ever measured in xenon 124. The element's half-life is many orders of magnitude greater than the current age of the universe. Their results appear in Nature.
Five new innovators join Chain Reac...

Five new innovators join Chain Reaction Innovations in third cohort

(DOE/Argonne National Laboratory) Five new innovators will be joining Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI), the entrepreneurship program at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory, as part of the elite program's third cohort. Announced on Monday, April 22, 2019, these innovators were selected following an extensive national solicitation process and two-part pitch competition, with reviews from industry experts, investors, scientists and engineers.
Despite increase in insurance cover...

Despite increase in insurance coverage for depression, growth in spending remains modest

(Emory Health Sciences) A new investigation finds that while insurance coverage for depression has increased, treatment rates are lower than expected, indicating that non-financial barriers to patient care still remain.
Preparing for a changing population...

Preparing for a changing population -- what it means to age successfully

(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) A paper by Columbia Mailman School's John Rowe, M.D., Julius Richmond Professor of Health Policy and Aging, in the journal Health Affairs outlines the challenges we face as the US becomes an 'aging society.' This transformation has major implications for our core institutions which were not designed to support this changing population distribution.
Scholars: Estimates of food insecur...

Scholars: Estimates of food insecurity among college students problematic

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) A good estimate of how many college students struggle with food insecurity is a difficult number to pin down, says new research from a team of University of Illinois experts who study food choice issues.
Corruption contagion: How legal an...

Corruption contagion: How legal and finance firms are at greater risk of corruption

(University of Sussex) Companies with fewer levels of management such as legal, accountancy and investment banking firms could be up to five times more susceptible to corruption than similar sized organizations with a taller structure such as those in manufacturing, a new study by the University of Sussex and Imperial College has revealed.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Scientists observe 'rarest event ev...

Scientists observe 'rarest event ever recorded'

An extremely rare event has been observed by scientists working on unraveling the mysteries of dark matter. The discovery centers around the radioacti...
US Navy drafts new UFO reporting gu...

US Navy drafts new UFO reporting guidelines

Senior officials are putting together new guidelines to help pilots and other personnel report UFO sightings. Recently it emerged that between 2007 an...
NASA picks up 'Marsquake' for the f...

NASA picks up 'Marsquake' for the first time

The space agency's InSight lander has successfully picked up a seismic event on the Red Planet. The quake, which is the first ever to be detected on a...
Tesla promises fully autonomous car...

Tesla promises fully autonomous cars by 2020

The automotive and technology firm has revealed its plans for self-driving vehicles and automated taxis. Tesla's cars, which are already fitted with a...
Gigantic prehistoric predatory cat ...

Gigantic prehistoric predatory cat discovered

Palaeontologists unexpectedly came across fossil evidence of the creature in a museum drawer in Kenya. Larger than any of today's lions or tigers, thi...
Paranormal investigator Lorraine Wa...

Paranormal investigator Lorraine Warren dies

Warren and her husband Ed had been the inspiration behind 'The Conjuring' and 'The Amityville Horror.' The pair, who in 1952 founded the New England S...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

PopSci

There are no news from this channel.

Science News.org

There are no news from this channel.
Apr 24      Hits : 14448
place your ad here
My News Hub