Discovery

Thousands Evacuated as Chile Volcan...

Thousands Evacuated as Chile Volcano Erupts: Photos

A volcano in southern Chile erupted Tuesday, spewing fiery plumes of lava into the night sky and forcing the evacuation of about 3,600 people from nearby towns.
Inside an Alaskan Ice Cave

Inside an Alaskan Ice Cave

Go inside Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska -- a-12-mile-long sheet of ice.
Did Climate Change Tip Syria Into W...

Did Climate Change Tip Syria Into War?

Climate change from 2006 to 2010 may have helped exacerbate the economic and social collapse that led to today's bloody Syrian conflict. Continue reading ?
Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (...

Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (March 2)

Saharan dust energizes the Amazon, dozens of new sinkholes are found in Siberia, and an ancient tree frames a Hobbit-like building.
Ice Storm Captured Before the Melt:...

Ice Storm Captured Before the Melt: Photos

A late winter ice storm creates a sparkling, dripping, ephemeral world on Maryland's Eastern Shore.
Satellite Captures Amazing 3-D Vide...

Satellite Captures Amazing 3-D Videos of Rain, Snow

New NASA space technology is helping researchers track rain and snowfall across the globe and predict cyclones, landslides and floods. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

U.S. science probe nears unexplored...

U.S. science probe nears unexplored dwarf planet Ceres

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - A NASA science satellite on Friday will wrap up a 7-1/2-year journey to Ceres, an unexplored dwarf planet in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, scientists said on Monday. Ceres, namesake of the Roman goddess of agriculture, is already providing intrigue.
U.S. ends program flagging 'sensiti...

U.S. ends program flagging 'sensitive' patent requests

A little known but controversial program that flagged sensitive patent applications involving potentially touchy subjects such as AIDS vaccines and abortion devices has been scrapped by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The program, called the Sensitive Application Warning System, began in 1994 and was meant to notify the agency's leadership of applications that could generate extensive or unfavorable publicity. "Upon careful consideration, the USPTO has concluded that the SAWS program has only been marginally utilized and provides minimal benefit," the agency said in a notice posted to its website on Monday night. The agency's review of the program, conducted in January, came after attorneys Kate Gaudry and Thomas Franklin at law firm Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton revealed details of the program in December from documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.
U.S. satellite likely exploded afte...

U.S. satellite likely exploded after temperature spike: Air Force

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - A U.S. military weather satellite appears to have exploded while in orbit last month after a sudden temperature spike in its power system, producing 43 pieces of new space debris, the Air Force said on Tuesday. The blast, which was first reported by the industry trade publication Space News, was the second Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft to experience a catastrophic breakup in 11 years. Launched in 1995, the Air Force satellite was serving as an operational spare in the seven-member DMSP network. On Feb. 3, flight controllers observed a sudden temperature spike in the DMSP-F13 satellite's power system and quickly shut down its non-essential systems, but the spacecraft lost the ability to position itself, the Air Force said in a statement.
Harvard prevention trial studies ta...

Harvard prevention trial studies tau, Alzheimer's other protein

By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Alzheimer's researchers at Harvard for the first time are scanning the brains of healthy patients for the presence of a hallmark protein called tau, which forms toxic tangles of nerve fibers associated with the fatal disease. The new scans are part of a large clinical trial called Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's or A4, the first designed to identify and treat patients in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's, before memory loss begins. Patients accepted into the A4 trial already have deposits of beta amyloid, the other protein associated with Alzheimer's. The addition of the tau scan will allow scientists to get a much clearer picture of the events that lead to Alzheimer's. The disease affects 5 million Americans, and 16 million are projected to be afflicted by 2050. Dr. Reisa Sperling of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who is leading the 1,000-patient trial, said tau is commonly found in small amounts in healthy people over age 70, but it is generally confined to an area of the brain called the medial temporal lobe.
Study finds gorilla origins in half...

Study finds gorilla origins in half of human AIDS virus lineages

File photo of two gorillas in their enclosure at the zoo in Los AngelesBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Revealing new details about the origins of AIDS, scientists said on Monday half the lineages of the main type of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV-1, originated in gorillas in Cameroon before infecting people, probably via bushmeat hunting. HIV-1, which causes AIDS, is composed of four groups, each coming from a separate cross-species transmission of a simian version of the virus from apes to humans. ...

Cyborg Roaches Could Be Used to Fin...

Cyborg Roaches Could Be Used to Find Disaster Survivors

Cyborg Roaches Could Be Used to Find Disaster SurvivorsFleets of cyborg cockroaches could someday roam into damaged nuclear power plants or collapsed mines to carry out reconnaissance or locate survivors. A team of researchers implanted live cockroaches with electrodes that stimulate the nerves in the insects' antennae, enabling the scientists to steer the creatures around like remote-controlled toys. While people may normally think of cockroaches as pests that live on human waste, these insects are better than any small-scale robots that exist today, said Hong Liang, a materials scientist at Texas A&M University in College Station, and co-author of the study published online today (March 4) in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

Physorg.com

Study identifies first-ever human p...

Study identifies first-ever human population adaptation to toxic chemical, arsenic

High up in the high Andes mountains of Argentina, researchers have identified the first-ever evidence of a population uniquely adapted to tolerate the toxic chemical arsenic.
Grand tree of life study shows a cl...

Grand tree of life study shows a clock-like trend in new species emergence and diversity

Temple University researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time, and surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate.
'No take zones' in English Channel ...

'No take zones' in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry

Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing. However, while most people agree that stopping some types of fishing in MPAs would benefit wildlife and fisheries, working out which fishing activities should be banned is often complicated and controversial.
Why your laptop battery won't kill ...

Why your laptop battery won't kill you

News on Tuesday that major U.S. airlines are no longer going to ship powerful lithium-ion batteries might lead some to fret about the safety of their personal electronic devices.
Visa, MasterCard moving into mobile...

Visa, MasterCard moving into mobile pay in Africa

Americans may just be getting used to mobile pay, but consumers in many African countries have been paying with their phones for years. Now payment processors Visa and MasterCard want to get a slice of that market, and are launching card services aimed at Africa's growing mobile payment industry.
Waze map app to get Amber Alerts on...

Waze map app to get Amber Alerts on child abductions

The Waze navigation app is getting Amber Alerts on child abductions.

PBS

Invisible Universe Revealed

Invisible Universe Revealed

Follow the historic rescue of the Hubble?the space telescope that unveiled the cosmos.
Hagia Sophia: Istanbul's Mystery

Hagia Sophia: Istanbul's Mystery

How has this unique structure, built on a seismic fault, survived centuries of quakes?
Petra: Lost City of Stone

Petra: Lost City of Stone

How did early engineers carve tombs into rock cliffs and funnel water to this desert city?
Colosseum: Roman Death Trap

Colosseum: Roman Death Trap

1500 years ago, how did the Romans engineer bloody spectacles and reenact sea battles?
The Great Math Mystery

The Great Math Mystery

Is math invented by humans, or is it the language of the universe?
Sinkholes?Buried Alive

Sinkholes?Buried Alive

The catastrophic collapse of the ground beneath our feet is a growing worldwide hazard.

Scientific American

Ultracold-Resistant Chemical on Tit...

Ultracold-Resistant Chemical on Titan Could Allow It to Harbor Life

Computer simulations reveal that a compound found on Saturn’s largest moon may be able to form a freeze-resistant, flexible membrane that could encapsulate cells or organelles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Hot Water Corals in the Persian Gul...

Hot Water Corals in the Persian Gulf Could Help Save the World?s Reefs

The species may hold genetic clues that could help reefs worldwide adapt to warmer ocean temperatures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Climate Change Hastened Syria's Civ...

Climate Change Hastened Syria's Civil War

Human-induced drying in many societies can push tensions over a threshold that provokes violent conflict   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Dawn Spacecraft Sees Spots as It Ap...

Dawn Spacecraft Sees Spots as It Approaches Mysterious Ceres

Spectacular new images are trickling in from NASA’s mission to a dwarf planet in the Asteroid Belt -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Push Back at Government and Corpora...

Push Back at Government and Corporate Personal Privacy Incursions [Excerpt]

Digital security specialist Bruce Schneier’s latest book examines the repercussions of—and the appropriate responses to—ubiquitous corporate and governmental harvesting of personal... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Novel Energy Inventions Seek Greate...

Novel Energy Inventions Seek Greater Impact

A Q&A with the new head of Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy chemist Ellen Williams -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Cheap wonder metals will make a fas...

Cheap wonder metals will make a faster, cleaner world

If only aluminium, titanium and magnesium were cheaper, they would replace steel and help us cut fuel bills and emissions. That day may not be far off
Here's the beef - think green and c...

Here's the beef - think green and cut meat

The US panel advising the government on dietary guidelines urges Americans to eat less meat. There is nothing wrong with that, says Josh Voorhees
Test yourself on Facebook's intelli...

Test yourself on Facebook's intelligence question

Fancy taking Facebook's AI exam for yourself? Here are some example questions that get progressively harder
Birth of a Theorem: Mathematics, Bo...

Birth of a Theorem: Mathematics, Boltzmann and brio

Birth of a Theorem: A mathematical adventure by Fields medallist Cedric Villani is an exhilarating but exhausting journey with a fascinating mind
It's man flu! Real flu hits just tw...

It's man flu! Real flu hits just twice a decade

Your girlfriend is right. Adults can expect to get flu only twice every 10 years, suggests an analysis of the antibodies in people's blood
Facebook invents an intelligence te...

Facebook invents an intelligence test for machines

Forget the Turing test. Facebook has come up with a simple quiz that will help work out the intelligence levels of your latest AI

NY times.com Science

Europe Unlikely to Meet Climate Goa...

Europe Unlikely to Meet Climate Goal, Study Finds

The European Union will most likely fail to meet an ambitious goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, a report has found.
Basics: Termites: Guardians of the ...

Basics: Termites: Guardians of the Soil

From jungles to drylands, colonies are preserving landscapes and protecting ecosystems. Just keep them out of the house.
Attention, All Scientists: Do Impro...

Attention, All Scientists: Do Improv, With Alan Alda?s Help

The former star of the television show ?M*A*S*H? helps teach a way to explain complicated concepts in a clearer way.
Dot Earth Blog: Two Minutes to Midn...

Dot Earth Blog: Two Minutes to Midnight for the World?s Tiniest Cetacean ? Mexico?s Vaquita

Without tougher enforcement of fishing rules, time will soon run out for Mexico?s vaquita, the world?s smallest cetacean.
Climate Change Researcher Offers a ...

Climate Change Researcher Offers a Defense of His Practices

Wei-Hock Soon, who is at the center of a controversy over fossil-fuel funding for climate research, denounced his critics and said he would be happy to comply with possible additional disclosure requirements.
Business Briefing: Netherlands Regr...

Business Briefing: Netherlands Regrets Ignoring Earthquakes at Natgas Field

The Dutch government apologized on Monday for ignoring the risks posed by earthquakes caused by production of natural gas in the northern province of Groningen.

Science Daily

Lightning plus volcanic ash make gl...

Lightning plus volcanic ash make glass

Researchers have proposed a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcanic lightning. The existence of fulgurites -- glassy products formed in rocks and sediments struck by cloud-to-ground lightning -- provide direct evidence that geologic materials can be melted via natural lightning occurrence.
Newly discovered hormone mimics the...

Newly discovered hormone mimics the effects of exercise

Scientists have discovered a new hormone that fights the weight gain caused by a high-fat Western diet and normalizes the metabolism -- effects commonly associated with exercising. When tested in mice, the hormone blocked the negative health effects of eating a high-fat diet.
Bird flu: New compound protects 100...

Bird flu: New compound protects 100 percent of ferrets, mice, from H5N1

Medical researchers have developed an antibody which has proven 100 percent protective against the H5N1 virus in two species of animal models.
First scientific publication from d...

First scientific publication from data collected at National Synchrotron Light Source II

Just weeks after NSLS-II achieved first light, a team of scientists tested a setup that yielded data on thermoelectric materials. To test the optical performance and components of the beamline, the scientists put a material in the path of the x-ray beam and attempted to characterize its structure as the best way to identify and fix possible flaws or aberrations that the instrument could have caused.
Neuroscientists identify new way se...

Neuroscientists identify new way several brain areas communicate

Neuroscientists have identified a new pathway by which several brain areas communicate within the brain's striatum. The findings illustrate structural and functional connections that allow the brain to use reinforcement learning to make spatial decisions. Knowing how these specific pathways work together provides crucial insight into how learning occurs. It also could lead to improved treatments for Parkinson's disease.
New tech could significantly cut ca...

New tech could significantly cut carbon dioxide emissions

A provisionally patented technology could revolutionize carbon dioxide capture and help significantly reduce pollution worldwide.

Eureka Alert

Women in business

Women in business

(University of California - Santa Barbara) A sociologist traces systemic bias in favor of male-led businesses to stereotypical beliefs about entrepreneurs.
Real estate bidding wars aren't goi...

Real estate bidding wars aren't going away

(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) Frenzy, frustration and disappointment are what home buyers have come to dread about real estate bidding wars. They'd better get used to it, suggests a new study. Once a rarity -- representing between 3 and 4 per cent -- homes sold through bidding wars tripled their market share during the real estate boom between 1995 and 2005, says the paper by two professors at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.
The F-word you need more of at work...

The F-word you need more of at work -- or get fired

(University of Waterloo) Leadership has boomed into it's own industry. The US alone spends over $14 billion a year on it; you can get a Ph.D. in it; and we promote it to kids as the way to get ahead in life. But new research from a University of Waterloo professor and his wife reveals there might be something most employees are overlooking and, if you don't do it well, will probably get you fired.
Researchers find 3-D printed parts ...

Researchers find 3-D printed parts provide low-cost, custom alternatives for lab equipment

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Article describes experiments showing that 3-D printed parts work well for laboratory use.
NREL science crucial to success of ...

NREL science crucial to success of new biofuels plants

(DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory) The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory played crucial roles in the technology that has led companies DuPont, POET, and Abengoa to open commercial-scale facilities to turn biomass into clean transportation fuels.
NREL takes first in-depth look at s...

NREL takes first in-depth look at solar project completion timelines

(DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory) The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has gathered and analyzed data for more than 30,000 solar photovoltaic installations across the United States to better understand how interconnection regulations align with actual project completion timelines. The findings indicate that interconnection process delays are common, and can range from several days to months. Streamlining the application review and final authorization processes can ultimately benefit utilities and solar consumers by reducing the time and cost associated with going solar.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Explorers discover lost city in Hon...

Explorers discover lost city in Honduras

The ancient ruins were found during an expedition to locate the fabled 'City of the Monkey God'. Found deep within a remote uninhabited region of the ...
What is the Pentagon's $55 billion ...

What is the Pentagon's $55 billion plane ?

The bleeding edge bomber remains shrouded in secrecy and its costs may be spiraling out of control. It's one of the Air Force's most top secret projec...
Weasel goes for a ride on a woodpec...

Weasel goes for a ride on a woodpecker

An amateur photographer has captured the moment a weasel hitched a ride on the back of a woodpecker. Martin Le-May had been out for a walk with his wi...
Has Jesus' house been found in Naza...

Has Jesus' house been found in Nazareth ?

Archaeologists have identified the 1st century house in which Jesus was believed to have been brought up. The house, which was discovered in 1880 by n...
Did Homer discover the Higgs Boson ...

Did Homer discover the Higgs Boson ?

The popular Simpsons character apparently calculated the particle's mass 14 years before its discovery. He might not be the sharpest tool in the box a...
Doomsday vault receives first tree ...

Doomsday vault receives first tree samples

Norway's Svalbard depository enables the storage and research of seeds from all over the world. Located on the island of Spitsbergen in the remote Arc...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Penguins? How tasteless

Penguins? How tasteless

Penguins may look all dressed up in tuxedo-wear, but their taste buds are the bare minimum. This means that the birds will never sense more than a hint of their meals? true flavors.
Eyelashes: The ?sweet? length

Eyelashes: The ?sweet? length

New mathematical and aerodynamics studies find what seems to be the optimal length for eyelashes ? the length that protects best. And surprise: Longer is not always better.
Scientists confirm ?greenhouse? eff...

Scientists confirm ?greenhouse? effect of human?s CO2

Government scientists link directly, for the first time, a boost in warming at Earth?s surface to increasing levels of carbon dioxide. Much of that gas has been released by human activities, such as coal burning and gas-burning vehicles.
Mice can teach us about human disea...

Mice can teach us about human disease

Humans and mice look and act very differently. But 85 to 90 percent of their genes are the same or quite similar. So an international group of scientists is deciphering the instructions in mouse genes to help us better understand our own.
QUESTIONS for Mice Can Teach Us abo...

QUESTIONS for Mice Can Teach Us about Human Disease

Questions for Mice Can Teach Us About Human Disease
Ocean animals have mushroomed in si...

Ocean animals have mushroomed in size

ompared to a half-billion year ago, sea creatures are, on average, roughly 150 times bigger, a new study finds.

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