Discovery

Denali's Digits: North America's Ta...

Denali's Digits: North America's Tallest Peak Shrinks by 10 Feet

Denali ? the tallest peak in North America ? not only has a new name (or, more accurately, its old name), but a new official height.
Summer Sea Ice Likely to Drop to 4t...

Summer Sea Ice Likely to Drop to 4th Lowest on Record

Arctic sea ice is nearing its annual summer minimum extent, which should be among the 4 lowest, driven by global warming. Continue reading ?
As Sixth Largest Salt Lake Dries Up...

As Sixth Largest Salt Lake Dries Up, Iran Tries to Save It

Despite penury and isolation, Iran has launched its most ambitious environmental project ever in hopes of saving the world?s sixth largest salt lake and its wildlife. Continue reading ?
Will Talk of The 'Big One' Shake th...

Will Talk of The 'Big One' Shake the US Into Quake Prep?

A massive earthquake up to magnitude 9.2 strikes the Pacific coast on average every 243 years -- and it's been 315 since the last one. Continue reading ?
There Are 3 Trillion Trees on the P...

There Are 3 Trillion Trees on the Planet

We're outnumbered -- that comes to 422 trees per human being. But their numbers are dwindling.
2015 El Nino Could Be One of Strong...

2015 El Nino Could Be One of Strongest Since the 1950s

This year's El Niño is historically powerful, after unprecedented changes related to global warming, according to the World Meteorological Organization. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Boeing opens commercial spaceship p...

Boeing opens commercial spaceship plant in Florida

Boeing Company Chairman McNerney speaks at The Economic Club of WashingtonBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Boeing Co took the wraps off an assembly plant on Friday for its first line of commercial spaceships, which NASA plans to use to fly crews to the International Space Station, officials said. "This is a point in history that reflects a new era in human spaceflight," Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg said at a grand opening ceremony at the Kennedy Space Center. Boeing's newly named CST-100 Starliner spaceships will be prepared for flight in a processing hangar once used by NASA's space shuttles.

Three-man international crew safely...

Three-man international crew safely reaches space station

Cosmonauts Aimbetov of Kazakhstan, Volkov of Russia and astronaut Mogensen of Denmark pose behind glass wall after news conference at Baikonur cosmodromeA Russian Soyuz spaceship safely delivered a three-man international crew, including Denmark's first astronaut, to the International Space Station (ISS) on Friday, a day after having had to maneuver to avoid colliding with space debris. The Soyuz TMA-18M blasted off to the $100 billion space laboratory from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday to take Russian Commander Sergei Volkov, Kazakh cosmonaut Aidyn Aimbetov and Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen into orbit.

Toyota partners with Stanford, MIT ...

Toyota partners with Stanford, MIT on self-driving car research

A woman looks inside a Toyota Motor Corp's showroom in TokyoBy Paul Lienert DETROIT (Reuters) - Toyota Motor Corp is collaborating with two top U.S. universities on artificial intelligence and robotics research aimed at ramping up the Japanese automaker's efforts to develop self-driving cars. Toyota said on Friday that it would spend $50 million over the next five years to establish joint research centers at both universities, one in the heart of Silicon Valley and the other outside Boston. Toyota has lagged behind rivals in developing self-driving cars and implementing hands-free driver assistance systems.

Snot-filled whale research takes fl...

Snot-filled whale research takes flight

By Ben Gruber Gloucester, Mass. (Reuters) - Snotbot is a drone whose name describes it perfectly, it's a robot that collects snot, specifically whale snot. Up until now, gathering samples for whale research involved shooting darts that penetrated the body. Instead of shooting darts at a whale for biopsy samples, a whale can unknowingly shoot snot at a drone.  "We believe that whale snot or exhaled breath condensate is going to be the golden egg of data from a whale.
Key radar fails on $1 billion NASA ...

Key radar fails on $1 billion NASA environmental satellite

File photo of United Launch Alliance rocket launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in CaliforniaBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - A key instrument on a $1 billion NASA satellite has failed, reducing scientists' ability to capture data to measure the moisture in Earth's soil in order to improve flood forecasting and monitor climate change, officials said on Thursday. A second instrument remains operational aboard the 2,100-pound (950-kg) Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite, though its level of detail is far more limited. The satellite's high-powered radar system, capable of collecting data in swaths of land as small as about 2 miles (3 km) across, failed in July after less than three months in operation, NASA said.

Lab-Grown Bones? They Could Make Pa...

Lab-Grown Bones? They Could Make Painful Grafts History (Op-Ed)

Lab-Grown Bones? They Could Make Painful Grafts History (Op-Ed)Nina Tandon is CEO and co-founder of EpiBone.com, a New York City based startup focus on engineering living bones made from patients' own cells. Tandon is a scientist, biomedical engineer, TED Senior Fellow and co-author of Super Cells: Building with Biology (TED Conferences, 2014). This op-ed is part of a series provided by the World Economic Forum Technology Pioneers, class of 2015. If you've lost a healthy bone to an accident or illness, or if you were born with bones that aren't the right shape, what do you do?

Physorg.com

Researchers launch new online wildl...

Researchers launch new online wildlife disease reporting system

Two researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) were instrumental in creating a new online portal for scientists studying a disease that is threatening the global populations of amphibians, reptiles and fish.
Review: New light bulbs offer alter...

Review: New light bulbs offer alternative to LEDs and CFLs

For consumers who are still bemoaning the phaseout of incandescent light bulbs, hate the harsh CFLs and can't figure out LEDs, another option may be on the horizon - a new kind of bulb is slated to hit store shelves this fall.
Review: Two new phones are serious ...

Review: Two new phones are serious contenders for Samsung's flagship

Samsung is looking for the right combination of features to dethrone the iPhone as king of the smartphone world.
Ice Age fossils found in Carlsbad w...

Ice Age fossils found in Carlsbad where new homes planned

Fossils from the last Ice Age, including bones of ancient mammoths and a prehistoric bison, have been found at a Carlsbad construction site where hundreds of new homes are planned.
September launch could give UW team...

September launch could give UW team rare measurements of 'dusty plasmas'

Researchers from the University of Washington are awaiting the launch an over 50-foot-long rocket from a launch site in Norway into the upper reaches of the atmosphere to observe and measure a puzzling phenomenon.
Typhoon Kilo's eye gets a NASA styl...

Typhoon Kilo's eye gets a NASA style close-up

NASA's Aqua satellite got a close-up of Typhoon Kilo's eye as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

PBS

Live Tweeting Our Past

Live Tweeting Our Past

The instant a key finding in human evolution was made, it was shared with the whole world.
Secrets of Noah's Ark

Secrets of Noah's Ark

A team attempts to build the flood boat using inscriptions from an ancient clay tablet.
CyberWar Threat

CyberWar Threat

As internet connections multiply so do points of attack and risks to national security.
Poop Weapons

Poop Weapons

Nothing says ?stay away? quite like a fecal shield.
Scientist? Artist. Pirate!

Scientist? Artist. Pirate!

Joe Davis is a one-of-a-kind individual sailing uncharted waters between art and science.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet Spinosaurus—the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest carnivorous dinosaur ever.

Scientific American

Racial Gap in Kidney Transplants Co...

Racial Gap in Kidney Transplants Combated by Policy Changes

Blacks and whites on the transplant list are finally getting the organs at equal rates, although fewer blacks may make it onto the lists to begin with -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Red Flag for a Neurodegenerative ...

A Red Flag for a Neurodegenerative Disease That May Be Transmissible

Animal experiments show how a just-discovered prion triggers a rare Parkinson’s-like disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Tribute to Oliver Sacks from Coll...

A Tribute to Oliver Sacks from Colleague and Friend Christof Koch

The famed neurologist–author found uniqueness in every patient and savored the miracle of existence, whether it be found in squirrel monkeys or people -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Oliver Sacks, Who Depicted Brain-Di...

Oliver Sacks, Who Depicted Brain-Disorder Sufferers' Humanity, Dies

The prolific author–neurologist gave the world empathetic insights into disorders of the brain while also inspiring films, plays, an opera and likely many careers in medicine and brain science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the...

"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the Key to Busting Superbugs

A broader understanding of bacterial social networks might help scientists combat antibiotic resistance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Size Matters When It Comes to Cells...

Size Matters When It Comes to Cells' Vulnerability to Parkinson's

Neurons involved in Parkinson’s disease are especially susceptible to burnout because of their complex branching -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Hawk?s invisible force shield prote...

Hawk?s invisible force shield protects hummingbird from jays

Small birds can be protected from a predator by the presence of an even bigger predator, which creates a no-go zone
Mental health apps let you access t...

Mental health apps let you access therapy from your smartphone

Apps that let users talk to human therapists or keep tabs on their own mental state are making therapy more accessible and affordable
Key enzyme helps country kids ward ...

Key enzyme helps country kids ward off allergies and asthma

Children's immune systems are less likely to be hypersensitive if they are exposed to rural dirt, but one enzyme may also be vital for this effect
Cane toad?s own killing strategy co...

Cane toad?s own killing strategy could be deployed against it

Tadpoles eat eggs of their own species ? but also poison the water to suppress competitors. This could be used to control the invasive species population
Chatty cellular machines take synth...

Chatty cellular machines take synthetic biology to next level

A new class of multicellular machines that can "talk" to each other will help usher in a new era of smart drugs
Intelligent cameras can put an end ...

Intelligent cameras can put an end to always-on surveillance

Many cities are packed with cameras pointlessly recording everything they see, but smart algorithms could allow them to keep only footage that matters

NY times.com Science

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Why Is S...

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Why Is Science So Straight?

Gays and lesbians are underrepresented in many STEM fields.
Renovation at Javits Center Allevia...

Renovation at Javits Center Alleviates Hazard for Manhattan?s Birds

The convention building has been a major site of avian fatalities, but a half-billion-dollar project has made it friendlier to wildlife.
New Type of Drug-Free Labels for Me...

New Type of Drug-Free Labels for Meat Has U.S.D.A. Blessing

Consumers will soon see the phrase ?produced without ractopamine,? which helps add muscle to animals, on packages of some pork products.
Circa Now: Conducting a Field Test ...

Circa Now: Conducting a Field Test on Pheromones

The mystery of scents inspires a personal research trial.
Observatory: Study Reveals Consiste...

Observatory: Study Reveals Consistent Predator-Prey Pattern

An analysis of animals from more than 1,500 locations worldwide found that the number of predators do not increase as rapidly as the number of prey does.
Boeing Names Its New Apollo-Style S...

Boeing Names Its New Apollo-Style Spacecraft the Starliner

Boeing already has the Dreamliner. Now it also has the Starliner.

Science Daily

IV administration of endothelin B r...

IV administration of endothelin B receptor drug reduces memory loss, oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

An estimated 5.3 million people in the U.S. suffer from Alzheimer?s disease (AD). The five current FDA-approved AD medications only help mask the disease symptoms instead of treating the underlying disease. In a new study, researchers used IRL-1620, a chemical that binds to endothelin B receptors, to treat AD in rats.
Vitamin C: The exercise replacement...

Vitamin C: The exercise replacement?

Exercise improves health in overweight and obese adults but can be hard to incorporate into a daily routine. New findings show that taking vitamin C supplements daily instead can have similar cardiovascular benefits as regular exercise in these adults.
Peering back in time to just after ...

Peering back in time to just after the Big Bang: Farthest galaxy ever detected

Researchers have reported the detection of the farthest object yet, galaxy EGS8p7. At more than 13.2 billion years old, it provides a fascinating glimpse of the very early universe, just 600,000 years after the Big Bang.
Common antidepressant may change br...

Common antidepressant may change brain differently in depressed and non-depressed people

A commonly prescribed antidepressant may alter brain structures in depressed and non-depressed individuals in very different ways.
Polar bears may survive ice melt, w...

Polar bears may survive ice melt, with or without seals

As climate change accelerates ice melt in the Arctic, polar bears may find caribou and snow geese replacing seals as an important food source, shows a recent study. The research is based on new computations incorporating caloric energy from terrestrial food sources and indicates that the bears' extended stays on land may not be as grim as previously suggested.
Highly effective seasickness treatm...

Highly effective seasickness treatment on the horizon

The misery of motion sickness could be ended within five to 10 years thanks to a new treatment being developed by scientists.

Eureka Alert

Georgetown and Howard receive $27 m...

Georgetown and Howard receive $27 million award for clinical and translational research

(Georgetown University Medical Center) A large clinical research program led by Georgetown and Howard universities, facilitating the participation of more than four million Washington-area residents in clinical trials, has received a $27 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health. The NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences awarded a five-year renewal of the prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award to Georgetown University and Howard University on Aug. 28.
Stop and smell the volatile organic...

Stop and smell the volatile organic compounds (video)

(American Chemical Society) Is there anything better than a bouquet of fresh flowers? Well, as it turns out, you're not the only one who likes the smell of posies -- some flowers use their aroma to attract pollinators. Find out how airborne volatile organic compounds give petunias, roses and the notoriously stinky 'corpse flower' their characteristic aromas in the latest Speaking of Chemistry.
Genetics Society of America support...

Genetics Society of America supports symposia organized by student and postdoc members

(Genetics Society of America) The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce the inaugural group of GSA Trainee-Organized Symposia, which are organized by student and postdoctoral members of the Society. These outstanding workshops will receive up to $2,000 in funding to cover direct meeting costs, such as speaker travel, facility rental, and promotion supplies.
SfN announces winners of Brain Awar...

SfN announces winners of Brain Awareness Video Contest

(Society for Neuroscience) Winners of SfN International 2015 Brain Awareness Video Contest Announced
Supervised tooth brushing and fluor...

Supervised tooth brushing and fluoride varnish schemes benefit kids and the health economy

(University of Plymouth) Action to prevent tooth decay in children, such as supervised tooth brushing and fluoride varnish schemes, are not just beneficial to children's oral health but could also result in cost savings to the NHS of hundreds of pounds per child, so says a leading dental health researcher.
Real competitors enhance thrill of ...

Real competitors enhance thrill of auctions

(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) The thrill is part of the game -- whoever waits for his bid to be accepted on online auction platforms, feels the excitement in the bidding war for the object of desire. The heart beats faster, palms start to sweat. Physiological measurement methods of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology now reveal the influence of emotions on the behavior of users of electronic markets.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Warminster mystery still endures 50...

Warminster mystery still endures 50 years on

A perplexing series of unexplained phenomena hit the English town of Warminster back in the 1960s. The strange incidents began in earnest on August 17...
Bear with a blue head filmed in Can...

Bear with a blue head filmed in Canada

Aaron Smith had been driving along a road in British Columbia when he spotted something very unusual. It had been around 5:15pm and he was heading hom...
Drone-busting chimp shows 'forward ...

Drone-busting chimp shows 'forward planning'

Scientists have been studying the case of a chimp that used a branch to knock a drone out of the air. The incident, which took place at the Royal Burg...
Russian schoolboy discovers 'Yeti f...

Russian schoolboy discovers 'Yeti footprint'

A 12-year-old boy was out camping in the wilds when he stumbled upon a large human-like footprint. Denis Alexandrov discovered the anomalous footprint...
Man receives giant spider through t...

Man receives giant spider through the post

A man in the UK was shocked when he found a huge tarantula in a parcel that was sent to his house. Anyone who has complained about receiving junk mail...
There are still three trillion tree...

There are still three trillion trees on Earth

The number of trees left in all the forests on Earth is now believed to measure in the trillions. In a new study led by scientists at Yale University ...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

PopSci

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Science News.org

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