Discovery

Millions Brace for Monster Blizzard...

Millions Brace for Monster Blizzard in U.S. Northeast

Winter Storm Juno is expected to dump up to three feet of snow in parts of the northeast.
What A Warming World Means for Majo...

What A Warming World Means for Major Snowstorms

As the climate changes, extreme snowfalls may become a bigger proportion of all snowstorms.
Atlantic, Pacific Fish Face Mixing ...

Atlantic, Pacific Fish Face Mixing as Arctic Warms

The Atlantic Cod could displace valuable Alaskan fish as the natural barrier of the Arctic Ocean warms with climate change.
What's a Nor'easter?

What's a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters, or northeasters, live up to their names. They affect the northeast coast of North America from Virginia to Canada, and the storms' rotation causes the leading winds to blow from the northeast.
'Possibly Historic' Blizzards to Sl...

'Possibly Historic' Blizzards to Slam Into Northeast

Heavy snow and blizzard conditions are forecast to hit the US northeast Monday, blanketing New York, Boston and beyond with up to a foot of snow.
Earth Shots: Must See Planet Pics (...

Earth Shots: Must See Planet Pics (Jan. 26)

This week: a salute to the platypus, a fire burns for 5,000 years, and a town in Argentina sinks -- then reappears.

Yahoo Science

Commercial space rides for U.S. ast...

Commercial space rides for U.S. astronauts to save millions: NASA

Astronauts onboard the International Space Station successfully capture the SpaceX Dragon spacecraftBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla (Reuters) - The U.S. space program should save more than $12 million a seat flying astronauts to and from the International Space Station on commercial space taxis rather than aboard Russian capsules, the NASA program manager said on Monday. In September, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration awarded contracts worth up to a combined $6.8 billion to Boeing and privately owned Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, to fly crew to the station, a $100 billion research laboratory about 260 miles above Earth. Since retiring the space shuttles in 2011, the United States has depended on Russia's space agency, Roscosmos, to ferry astronauts to the orbital outpost. NASA expects to pay an average of $58 million a seat when its astronauts begin flying on Boeing?s CST-100 and SpaceX?s Dragon capsules in 2017, Kathy Lueders, manager of NASA?s Commercial Crew program, told reporters during a news conference in Houston and via conference call.

University of Wisconsin closes labo...

University of Wisconsin closes laboratory, ending cat experiments

A University of Wisconsin research laboratory that attracted controversy for using live cats in experiments is closing this year, the school said. The University of Wisconsin at Madison said its Department of Neuroscience will no longer conduct experiments related to "sound localization" because Tom Yin, the department interim chair and chief researcher, is retiring at age 70. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals had criticized Yin for experiments the advocacy group said were cruel.
The upper hand: study points to ear...

The upper hand: study points to early tool use by human ancestors

Belgian animal sculptor Emmanuel Janssens Casteels works on a replica of an Australopithecus in his workshop in PrayssasScientists said on Thursday an analysis of fossil hand bones of the species Australopithecus africanus that lived in southern Africa about 3 million to 2 million years ago indicated this human forerunner could use its hands in ways very much like modern people. "Forceful precision grips have been linked specifically to stone tool use and tool making, and so it is possible that Australopithecus africanus was using stone tools as well," said Tracy Kivell of Britain's University of Kent, who helped lead the study published in the journal Science with fellow University of Kent paleoanthropologist Matthew Skinner. This species appeared roughly a half million years before the first evidence of stone tools. The traditional view of scientists is that a species called Homo habilis that appeared about 2.4 million years ago was the pioneer in stone tool use in the human lineage.

Giant asteroid set to buzz Earth, p...

Giant asteroid set to buzz Earth, poses no threat

Big Asteroid to Zoom by Earth on Jan. 26By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla (Reuters) - An asteroid measuring about a third of a mile (half a kilometer) in diameter will make a relatively close, but harmless pass by Earth Monday night, NASA said. The asteroid will pass about 745,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) from Earth, roughly three times farther away than the moon. "While it poses no threat to Earth for the foreseeable future, it's a relatively close approach by a relatively large asteroid, so it provides us a unique opportunity to observe and learn more," astronomer Don Yeomans, with NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, said in a statement. The asteroid, which orbits the sun every 1.84 years, was discovered 11 years ago by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research, or LINEAR, telescope in New Mexico.

Rosetta spacecraft raises new quest...

Rosetta spacecraft raises new questions about comet?s origin

Artist rendering of Rosetta, the European Space Agency's cometary probe with NASA contributionsBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Scientists using Europe?s comet-orbiting Rosetta spacecraft have discovered that the complicated ancient body is coated with surprisingly simple organic molecules and surrounded by a changing cloud of gases, according to new research released on Thursday. In November it released a piggyback-riding spacecraft, which descended to the comet?s surface for a series of independent studies. The Rosetta mission is intended to shed light on the solar system?s early days by studying one of its pristine comet remnants.

Pediatricians Oppose Medical Mariju...

Pediatricians Oppose Medical Marijuana, with Some Exceptions

Although a number of states have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational reasons in recent years, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians says it opposes such legalization, over concerns that these laws could be harmful to children. However, the group says that in some cases, some of the chemical compounds contained in marijuana could be used to treat children with debilitating diseases. Although none of these places allows the drug to be sold to children or teens, making marijuana available to adults could increase the access that teens have to the drug, according to a policy statement released today (Jan. 26) by the American Academy of Pediatrics. "Just the campaigns to legalize marijuana can have the effect of persuading adolescents that marijuana is not dangerous," Dr. Seth D. Ammerman, a member of the AAP Committee on Substance Abuse, said in a statement.

Physorg.com

Border Protection lends a hand for ...

Border Protection lends a hand for Super Bowl security

Black Hawk helicopters and truck-sized X-ray machines that are typically deployed along the U.S.-Mexico border have been brought to the Super Bowl venue to assist with the security effort.
Microsoft profit dips as revenue ri...

Microsoft profit dips as revenue rises

Microsoft on Monday reported that its quarterly profit dipped as revenue increased with help from sales of Surface tablets, Xbox One consoles and cloud services.
Black hole chokes on a swallowed st...

Black hole chokes on a swallowed star

A five-year analysis of an event captured by a tiny telescope at McDonald Observatory and followed up by telescopes on the ground and in space has led astronomers to believe they witnessed a giant black hole tear apart a star. The work is published this month in The Astrophysical Journal.
Montana oil spill estimate lowered ...

Montana oil spill estimate lowered to 30,000 gallons

Authorities have lowered their estimate of how much oil spilled from a broken pipeline beneath the Yellowstone River in eastern Montana, briefly contaminating the water supply of a city downstream.
Sagebrush ecosystem recovery hobble...

Sagebrush ecosystem recovery hobbled by loss of soil complexity at development sites

In big sagebrush country, re-establishing the ecosystem's namesake shrub may jump-start the recovery process more successfully after oil and gas development than sowing grass-dominated reclamation seed mixes typically used to quickly re-vegetate bare soil on well pads, report two Colorado scientists in the January 2015 issue of Ecological Applications, released today.
Ads effective even in the midst of ...

Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find

Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of your multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as the ads you're really watching, such as those during the Super Bowl, says a University of Illinois researcher.

PBS

Colosseum Building Blocks

Colosseum Building Blocks

The Colosseum was built in just several years due to a clever use of repeating arches.
Sunken Ship Rescue

Sunken Ship Rescue

A team of 500 engineers and divers struggle to raise the Costa Concordia cruise ship.
Big Bang Machine

Big Bang Machine

Explore the deepest mysteries of the early universe and the quest to find the Higgs Boson.
Building Wonders

Building Wonders

See how three magnificent ancient structures were engineered in this three-part series.
Colosseum: Roman Death Trap

Colosseum: Roman Death Trap

1500 years ago, how did the Romans engineer bloody spectacles and reenact sea battles?
Petra: Lost City of Stone

Petra: Lost City of Stone

How did early engineers carve tombs into rock cliffs and funnel water to this desert city?

Scientific American

Nor?easters May Become More Intense...

Nor?easters May Become More Intense with Climate Change

As Northeasterners hunker down to weather tonight’s potentially record-breaking winter storm, they may also want to brace themselves for even more severe nor’easters in the future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Weird X-Rays Spur Speculation about...

Weird X-Rays Spur Speculation about Dark Matter Detection

Scientists must now decide whether the anomalous signal is truly exotic or has a more mundane provenance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
New Life Made with Custom Safeguard...

New Life Made with Custom Safeguards

A bacterium famous for food poisoning has its genetics altered to produce fuel or pharmaceuticals—and to keep it from escaping the lab -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Super-Gifted Boys Choose Higher-Pow...

Super-Gifted Boys Choose Higher-Powered, Higher-Paying Careers Than Female Peers

A classic gender divide persists even among people who scored as 11- to 13-year-olds in the top 1 percent in the U.S. on the SAT -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Popular Cable-Stay Bridges Rise Acr...

Popular Cable-Stay Bridges Rise Across U.S. to Replace Crumbling Spans

The new bridge being built across the Hudson River is the latest to use this cost-effective design, which goes up faster and requires fewer materials than competing methods for medium-length... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Ebola Epidemic Takes a Toll on Sier...

Ebola Epidemic Takes a Toll on Sierra Leone?s Surgeons

Twenty percent of the nation’s surgical practitioners have been killed by Ebola -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Ancient planets are almost as old a...

Ancient planets are almost as old as the universe

The oldest rocky planets yet are 11.2 billion years old, just a little younger than the universe - meaning the galaxy made an early start on planet building
Shoes vs barefoot: The myth of the ...

Shoes vs barefoot: The myth of the normal foot

The average Western foot is deformed by shoes. If you ditch them, will your feet bounce back or are you simply asking for trouble? (full text available to subscribers)
Eco-city dreams vs real eco-activis...

Eco-city dreams vs real eco-activism

Utopian plans for green cities are blasted in Julie Sze's Fantasy Islands, while Paul Steinberg holds out hope for the humble in Who Rules the Earth?
How science tells us to ignore cele...

How science tells us to ignore celebrity endorsements

Tim Caulfield's Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything? shows that celebrity advice, while difficult to ignore, is bunkum
La Niņas on the rise in climate cha...

La Niņas on the rise in climate change double whammy

A see-saw effect of warm water slushing in the equatorial Pacific may make extreme climate events El Niņo and La Niņa twice as frequent
Tape of life may not always be rand...

Tape of life may not always be random

If we could turn back the clock millions of years, would animals evolve in the same way? Genome data suggests that their options would be limited

NY times.com Science

The Operation Before the Operation

The Operation Before the Operation

Three-dimensional printing allows surgeons to foresee issues, not stumble into them.
Treatment of Overdose Will Cost Cit...

Treatment of Overdose Will Cost Cities Less

The Clinton Foundation on Monday announced that it had negotiated a lower price for an emergency treatment that can prevent heroin overdoses with a company that makes it.
World Briefing: Canada: Residents T...

World Briefing: Canada: Residents Tests Positive for H7N9 Bird Flu After Trip to China

A resident of British Columbia has tested positive for the H7N9 avian flu virus in the first documented case of the infection in a human in North America, the federal government said Monday.
World Briefing: British Data Echoes...

World Briefing: British Data Echoes U.S. Climate Report

Last year tied with 2010 as the hottest on record, in a new sign of long-term global warming stoked by human activities, British researchers said Monday.
Dot Earth Blog: Flawed Case Contrib...

Dot Earth Blog: Flawed Case Contributes to Acquittals in Murder of Costa Rican Turtle Guardian

Seven men charged in the killing of a Costa Rican turtle conservationist are acquitted of murder charges.
My Very Educated Readers Just Serve...

My Very Educated Readers Just Served Us Some New Planet Mnemonics

We asked our readers to submit their own mnemonics, including the dwarf planets. Here are some of our favorites:

Science Daily

Ads effective even in the midst of ...

Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find

Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as ads you're really watching, says one expert. It depends on how you perceive and process media content -- whether your processing 'style' is to focus more on one thing or to take it all in. It also may depend on your mood.
NOAA's DSCOVR going to a 'far out' ...

NOAA's DSCOVR going to a 'far out' orbit

Many satellites that monitor the Earth orbit relatively close to the planet, while some satellites that monitor the sun orbit our star. DSCOVR will keep an eye on both, with a focus on the sun. To cover both the Earth and sun, it will have an unusual orbit in a place called L1.
Pilotless aircraft will play critic...

Pilotless aircraft will play critical roles in precision agriculture

A new article outlines many of the potential roles drones can play in university research, and the advantages they can offer in speed, cost and data collection.
Relationship critical for how cells...

Relationship critical for how cells ingest matter

To survive and fulfill their biological functions, cells need to take in material from their environment. In this process, proteins within the cell pull inward on its membrane, forming a pit that eventually encapsulates the material in a bubble called a vesicle. Researchers have now revealed a relationship that governs this process, known as endocytosis.
Hospitals helping violence victims ...

Hospitals helping violence victims could save millions

In the first systematic look at the economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention, researchers demonstrate that, in addition to transforming victims' lives, these programs may indeed save a significant amount of money compared to non-intervention, in various sectors including health care and criminal justice, up to about $4 million to serve 90 clients in a 5-year period.
Researchers use oxides to flip grap...

Researchers use oxides to flip graphene conductivity

A team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to change the amount of electrons that reside in a given region within a piece of graphene, they have a proof-of-principle in making the fundamental building blocks of semiconductor devices using the 2-D material.

Eureka Alert

Ads effective even in the midst of ...

Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as ads you're really watching, says University of Illinois advertising professor Brittany Duff. It depends on how you perceive and process media content -- whether your processing 'style' is to focus more on one thing or to take it all in. It also may depend on your mood.
Hospitals helping violence victims ...

Hospitals helping violence victims could save millions

(Drexel University) In the first systematic look at the economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention, Drexel researchers demonstrate that, in addition to transforming victims' lives, these programs may indeed save a significant amount of money compared to non-intervention, in various sectors including health care and criminal justice, up to about $4 million to serve 90 clients in a 5-year period.
Students master math through moveme...

Students master math through movement using Kinect for Windows

(University of Vermont) Recent study in the Journal of Mathematical Behavior shows significant gains in the understanding of angles and angle measurements by elementary school students who performed body-based tasks while interacting with a Kinect for Windows mathematics program.
AU professor's new book unveils pro...

AU professor's new book unveils pros and cons of reading onscreen

(American University) E-book or print book: does it matter? According to new research by American University linguistics professor Naomi Baron, depending on the circumstances, the answer is yes.
'Women in Oceanography: A Decade La...

'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later' published by The Oceanography Society

(The Oceanography Society) The Oceanography Society is pleased to announce publication of 'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later.' This supplement to the December issue of Oceanography magazine reviews the progress that has been made over the last 10 years in addressing barriers to career advancement for women oceanographers and where further attention to this issue might still be needed. TOS published its first 'Women in Oceanography' volume in March 2005.
Girls lead boys in academic achieve...

Girls lead boys in academic achievement globally

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Considerable attention has been paid to how boys' educational achievements in science and math compare to girls' accomplishments in those areas, often leading to the assumption that boys outperform girls in these areas. Now, using international data, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Glasgow in Glasgow, Scotland, have determined that girls outperform boys in educational achievement in 70 percent of the countries they studied -- regardless of the level of gender, political, economic or social equality.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

MI5 spent years investigating crop ...

MI5 spent years investigating crop circles

The mysterious patterns were once believed to be secret codes designed to guide German bombers. These days crop circles are generally regarded to be a...
Evidence of flowing water found on ...

Evidence of flowing water found on Vesta

Scientists have discovered indications that liquid water was once present on the asteroid's surface. Visited by NASA's Dawn spacecraft back in 2011, V...
Scientists find a way to unboil an ...

Scientists find a way to unboil an egg

The impossible has been made possible thanks to scientists at universities in California and Australia. The process of boiling an egg, which sees the ...
Scientists slow down the speed of l...

Scientists slow down the speed of light

Physicists in Scotland have slowed down the speed at which light travels through air for the first time. The speed of light is one of the fundamental ...
'Human shadow' photographed on Mars

'Human shadow' photographed on Mars

Conspiracy theorists claim to have identified the shadow of a man working on the Curiosity rover. From traffic lights to human bones, anomaly hunters ...
Was tape used to cover up Apollo 7 ...

Was tape used to cover up Apollo 7 UFO ?

A peculiar object was recorded high above the Earth by astronauts during an early manned mission. The Apollo moon landings have been the subject of co...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Machine simulates the sun?s core

Machine simulates the sun?s core

A machine heats iron atoms to temperatures that match the interior of the sun. This has helped solve a solar mystery.
Resilient hearts for deep-sea diver...

Resilient hearts for deep-sea divers

How do aquatic mammals have enough energy to hunt prey while steeply dropping their heart rate to stay underwater? A new study of dolphins and seals provides clues.
New germ fighter turns up in dirt

New germ fighter turns up in dirt

Scientists have found a compound in soil that can kill the microbes that cause anthrax, tuberculosis and other diseases.
Tides may regularly swamp many U.S....

Tides may regularly swamp many U.S. cities

As sea levels rise, many cities will begin to experience frequent and extensive flooding at high tides. In some areas ? even Washington, D.C. ? such flooding could become a weekly headache.
Questions for Tides Swamp U.S. Cit...

Questions for Tides Swamp U.S. Cities

Questions for Tides Swamp U.S. Cities
Air pollution can mess with our DNA...

Air pollution can mess with our DNA

New research suggests a type of air pollution ? diesel fumes ? can affect your health. It inappropriately switches some genes on, while turning off others.

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